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Beginners Guide to Close Quarter Battles

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*UPDATED * With feedback from Rock-climby-Dave and DX115FALCON


Gentlemen.


A lot of chat on the forum evolves around equipment and the law which is great, but thought I'd sling my thoughts on first time games for new players. I've only ever fought CQB but I imagine much of my experiences are reflected in outdoor fights to.


1 - To much ammo is better than too little. 5 mid caps of around 120 is a good number. Expect to get through 2-3 Mags per round. As your ability improves you'll find you need less and you can use the spare space for other accessories.


2 - If using an all metal pistol on a cold day, keep the spare magazines in your pocket rather than your webbing. Your body heat will keep the gas warmer.


3 - When the team selection goes down, aim to be on the team WITHOUT a band. Identifying aggressors is easier when you need only spot a band, as it removes the shoot/don't shoot element. If your banded then you are constantly looking for something that isn't there, rather than being un-banded and looking for something that is there. The difference is subtle but increases survivability.


4 - Replace only one piece of a gear at a time. As your experience grows and you become accustomed to your loadout a radical change of both weapon/mount/webbing etc can throw you out of your comfort zone. Replace and tweak your loadout in steps.


5 - Use common sense with regards to weapon size. Avoid long rifles such as M14s, Garands or Sig 552s with long barrels. Rifles like the M4, G36 and MP5 will give you much more flexibility. Stay away from sniper rifles.


6 - Don't be fooled thinking folding stocks will improve performance in game. Folding stocks make it easy to transport the gun, but in a fight folding the stock removes one contact point to your body from the rifle; this throws you off target and makes it much harder to place repeatable shots.


7 - Keep moving. The only thing you can be certain of in CQB is that the last kill/kills you had cleared what's in front of you. The minute you slow down the chance of some one coming up behind you increases exponentially. The only time you should get shot in the back is when it's friendly fire.


8 - Be brave. The standard contact lasts all of around 15 seconds. If you are last in a group of 3, the lead player will gain around 80% of the kills, with the 2nd gaining the rest. Being 3 steps behind them can be the equivalent of being in another country.


9 - When buying your first gear avoid pistols early on. Switching from rifle to pistol is always slick in the films, but under fire can be a pain in the arse as you don't want to throw your much loved rifle to the floor, nor get tangled in the strap. Get comfortable with the Rifle, add the pistol later.


10 - If you or a teammate pops a pyro into a room, follow it in as soon as it goes bang. If a friendly enters a room, you want to be attached to the back of him and turn to the opposite corner that he does.


11 - Beware the double pyro tactic. One grenade lands, you take cover, a boom later and your out of cover only to get blown by the second grenade that followed the first. After the bang, count to 3 before breaking cover.


12 - Beware the rush follow up: Same as above. After a pyro strike stay hidden and count to 3, by the time you surface you'll have the drop on the guys that rushed to see if there pyro investment paid off.


13 - Keep quiet, and be apologetic. In the miasma of your first skirmish it's easy to shoot your own team, miss hits that you should have taken, fire on full auto in single shot areas and crash into people in a panic. I'm guilty of all of these. Avoid confrontation, don't try and talk your way out of errors and be humble. Apologies are cheap.


14 - Tempers tend to run high during the second third of your skirmish. The first third everyone is running on adrenaline and having a great time, and the final third everyone has had a good day and racked up plenty of kills. During the middle third however some players start to get tired and if there having a bad fight and clocked a meager kill count start to get arsey. Don't worry, ride it out and just walk away from anyone that's in a bad mood.


15 - But that said don't hesitate to speak to a marshal if someone is unreasonably unfair. New players are the lifeblood of the sport and marshals WILL take you seriously.


16 - Take two battery's. Nothing kills your afternoon than having to wait for your sole battery to recharge.


17 - Buy a tracer. They are the single best investment you can make, as they practically remove the need to aim and it's crystal clear when your out of ammo. There's an argument that tracer gives away your location, but if your following points 5 and 8 by the time the opposition knows your location it's to late.


18 - Full auto is rarely your friend. Instead of missing the target once you've missed it 16 times. In my experience veterans tend to stay on single shot throughout as this encourages firing discipline and makes a world of difference to your ammo count. That said...


19 - ...occasionally being able to fill the air with BB's is worth more than hitting something. The suppression effect (especially when using tracer) is profound. In one instance I was able to keep an entire team locked down for the best part of 3 minutes by laying down a wall of fire. It brought time for my team to rally around me.


20 - Watch body language. Once or twice a game you'll experience that golden moment when you come across a single or group of enemy and you'll have a 100% drop on them. When this happens don't rush the moment. Pause, observe, and you'll see that amazing moment when they drop their guard. Their rifle will sag, there shoulders will drop, there head will lazily pan left to right and they'll shifty from foot to foot. That's your moment. Run them down.


21 - Watch your own body language: If your rifle points at the floor, you're as good as dead. That is the moment someone comes around the corner. If you can see an opportunity for someone to jump out at you, your rifle should be pointed at it.


22 - Don't become a victim of Target Fixation. I'm frequently guilty of this, steaming into a room, mowing down the opposition only to have a guy with a pistol plant a round in my back that was stood to the left. Try to keep a slither of awareness even when the adrenaline's pumping.


23 - Be prepared to get hit A LOT. In CQB, more than anywhere else, you can expect to be hit a damn site more often and at much closer range.


24 - Death or Glory. A final note that's less advice and more a way of getting more out of your day. If your with a friend, and you've spent the best part of 15 minutes stalking through the dark, only to have your mate clipped by a hidden sniper, go for a DoT move. Run the target down, even if he has the drop. The odds of getting him are remote but if you do it's glorious and if you don't you can go respawn with your mate and stay together. If nothing else it'll harden you up to the pain of getting shot close up.



Cheers troops

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Excellent advice mate, especially points 10 & 11

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also don't carry big rifles max length I would say G36k or M4A1

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Spot on. I especially liked the third point.

 

I thought I was the only person that thought about stuff in this much depth haha. I might share this in the description of my YouTube videos next time I do a CQB day.

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Great guide Mate! Pretty helpful ;)

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Soooooo true! Good guide there.

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Awesome guide many thanks

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Great advice. I find that most of the guides are for outdoors and a lot of the advice doesn't really apply in a CQB situation.

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Something that has occurred to me from first hand experience and many hours of goofing off at work carefully studying You-tube videos is that if you're entering a room with a bunch of other guys, don't just "stack up" or as the USMC call it "gagglefuck" near the door. If someone throws in a grenade/flashbang etc, get in there and help clear the room. Otherwise you're just wasting pyro and letting the enemy recover from the shock.

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Number 18 (the 2nd one) is an interesting point - bring the fight to the enemy! And if it is a sniper, he might have to change to his sidearm due to the minimum engagement range.

 

Anyway, it's similar to the ambush drill - charge the enemy! And that would look great on camera!

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Number 18 (the 2nd one) is an interesting point - bring the fight to the enemy! And if it is a sniper, he might have to change to his sidearm due to the minimum engagement range.

 

Anyway, it's similar to the ambush drill - charge the enemy! And that would look great on camera!

You don't tend to get too many snipers at CQB sites. The lower FPS limits and restricted space mean there is little effectiveness to be had from a sniper in that environment.

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three things from me:

1. If your rifle points at the floor, you're as good as dead. That is the moment someone comes around the corner. If you can see an opportunity for someone to jump out at you, your rifle should be pointed at it.

2. Practice magazine changes and changing to your pistol. practice in as many difference stances as possible. get to know when is easier to reload and when is easier to swap to your pistol.

3. If a pyro enters a room, follow it in as soon as it goes bang. If a friendly enters a room, you want to be attached to the back of him and turn to the opposite corner that he does.

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Advice from a younger CQB player:

 

1) Use common sense with regard to weapon size!

Don't even try to use a "full size" rifle like M14s, Garands or Sig 552s (with long barrels), among others. Especially when the site is indoors. I have seen people managing to hold their own with M14s, but they struggle compared to the likes of myself with my MP5K and Machine Pistols. Shotguns are always a good choice, provided that you own an expensive CO2 one or a decent tri-shot. Stay away from sniper rifles wherever possible.

*sidenote about shotguns: I used a tri-shot for the first time on September 1st and it is about the most fun that I have ever had while playing indoors!*

 

2) Bring plenty of magazines!

I cannot stress this enough as I only brought one hi-cap with my old AK and constantly ran out mid-game (and I am not one to go blazing through ammo either!) If you think that you may not have enough mags, it might be worth investing in some more. For Shotguns (tri-shot ones) try to bring about 10 or so shells to give you about 100 shots- usually 300 BBs.

 

3) Prepare to be hit... A LOT!

In CQB, more than anywhere else, you can expect to be hit a damn site more often and at much closer range. It may sting a wee bit more, but in all honesty, It really isn't that much of a pain-difference.

 

4) Don't expect to use auto very frequently!

Not sure if this is just my local site's rules, but there is likely to be a 10 metre engagement distance for auto when outside in a CQB arena, with no auto indoors. Someone correct me if this is a general rule or not.

 

5) Be prepared to encounter rule-breakers!

In CQB more than anywhere else, there are cheaters. In CQB that could be people not taking hits that clearly bounce off them while they shout out in pain, people using banned pyro (remote detonators seem to be a popular choice for this), people shooting you when you are clearly hit (granted, an itchy trigger finger can be blamed for this, but people do sometimes put 5 or so shots into the same dead player), or- most annoyingly- people who use full-auto indoors and under 10 metres. Totally pisses reasonable and rule-obeying players off.

 

Hope this has been helpful for you newer players! Any mistakes that you may notice, please let me know. I'd also like to know if the full-auto rule applys anywhere other than Fife Wargames.

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Advice from a younger CQB player:

I lot of this doesn't apply everywhere.

 

1) At my site I've had no problems with any size weapon I've used, and most people used 'full-sized' weapons, but snipers are always a silly idea in CQB.

 

2) I've never gone through more than two hi-caps in one game. I don't know about your site though but at mine there's plenty of breaks between missions. I can see what you're saying though, if you don't have many opportunities to reload your mags you're gonna run out after than non-CQB because you're gonna encounter more players.

 

3) I agree with this one though, in CQB you're gonna get hit more. Wear good gloves.I took quite a few painful shots to fingers before buying better gloves.

 

4) We're always allowed to use full auto unless a marshal says otherwise for certain games.

 

5) There's always rule breakers, I'm not sure why you say CQB has more of them though and as far as I know, no pyros are banned. Dead players often get shot, I'm guilty of doing it too, I see their team and fire before realising they have their arms up and gun above their head. You're usually forgiven if you just call out "Sorry!" though.

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Heres one most people overlook or in fact, think the opposite is the case:

 

a rifle with a folding stock is NOT good for CQB. A rifle with a folding stock is easy to transport to games.

folding the stock removes one contact point to your body from the rifle, this throws you off target and makes it much harder to place repeatable shots.

 

Get something with a shortish stock (for me at 5'11 an M4 stock should be on setting 2/3)

 

Hold the rifle as far forwards as is practical, this gives you much better pointability when on the move. It's hard to get used to thumb over bore but well worth the effort.

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I lot of this doesn't apply everywhere.

 

1) At my site I've had no problems with any size weapon I've used, and most people used 'full-sized' weapons, but snipers are always a silly idea in CQB.

 

2) I've never gone through more than two hi-caps in one game. I don't know about your site though but at mine there's plenty of breaks between missions. I can see what you're saying though, if you don't have many opportunities to reload your mags you're gonna run out after than non-CQB because you're gonna encounter more players.

 

3) I agree with this one though, in CQB you're gonna get hit more. Wear good gloves.I took quite a few painful shots to fingers before buying better gloves.

 

4) We're always allowed to use full auto unless a marshal says otherwise for certain games.

 

5) There's always rule breakers, I'm not sure why you say CQB has more of them though and as far as I know, no pyros are banned. Dead players often get shot, I'm guilty of doing it too, I see their team and fire before realising they have their arms up and gun above their head. You're usually forgiven if you just call out "Sorry!" though.

I think it depends on the style of "indoors" you play at to be fair. If it's a warehouse with barriers and obstacles set up then you're right, any size weapon would be fine. At The Malls you'll struggle to get through some places with anything much longer than an M4.

 

The full auto thing obviously depends on the site. At The Mall it's full auto in the main concourse and the shops immediately off it but single everywhere else.

 

Definitely agree with the protection issues. Whether you get hit more or not it'll certainly hurt more due to the close range (lower FPS limits not withstanding).

 

But yes, there's always the odd case of "tactical invincibility" I think it's just more obvious at closer ranges. Overkill happens because there's usually quite a bit of adrenaline going on in the close sweaty confines of a dark corridor complex but as long as dead players make it obvious they are dead then there's no reason for them to get rinsed on their way back to spawn!

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agreed, there's cqb and then there's f**king CLOSE qb, anyone who's ever played the courthouse in Bristol knows what I'm saying, no way would I take anything longer than an M4 into that place... wouldn't be able to get round half the corners with it!

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2) I've never gone through more than two hi-caps in one game.

DAFUQ?!

 

So at least once you've used upwards of 800 rounds in one CQB game (assuming you have an M4)? That's INSANE! I routinely go whole hour long games and barely get through more than 120 shots. You need to learn to aim my friend.

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DAFUQ?!

 

So at least once you've used upwards of 800 rounds in one CQB game (assuming you have an M4)? That's INSANE! I routinely go whole hour long games and barely get through more than 120 shots. You need to learn to aim my friend.

Accuracy through volume.

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I lot of this doesn't apply everywhere.

 

2) I've never gone through more than two hi-caps in one game. I don't know about your site though but at mine there's plenty of breaks between missions. I can see what you're saying though, if you don't have many opportunities to reload your mags you're gonna run out after than non-CQB because you're gonna encounter more players.

 

4) We're always allowed to use full auto unless a marshal says otherwise for certain games.

 

5) There's always rule breakers, I'm not sure why you say CQB has more of them though and as far as I know, no pyros are banned. Dead players often get shot, I'm guilty of doing it too, I see their team and fire before realising they have their arms up and gun above their head. You're usually forgiven if you just call out "Sorry!" though.

 

In response to your points:

 

2) I was meaning the point of Mags with regards to mid-caps. If you use *true* high capacity mags (>400 rounds) then you should be fine, but MP5 and SMG high-caps (~250 rounds) will require more mags.

 

4) This answers my question posed at the end of my post, thanks!

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Accuracy through volume.

"accuracy"

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Cheers for the feedback lads. Updated it with points from Rock-climby-Dave and DX115FALCO

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DAFUQ?!

 

So at least once you've used upwards of 800 rounds in one CQB game (assuming you have an M4)? That's INSANE! I routinely go whole hour long games and barely get through more than 120 shots. You need to learn to aim my friend.

Oh I don't know, suppressive fire can eat away at your ammo pretty quickly. Last time out I was suppressing the enemy and ran through about 600rds. I got plenty of kills too as it was just up from their objective!

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