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PureSilver

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    London, U.K.

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  1. Your Mate Dave was allowed to play without full-seal eye protection? You should add that to the "Meh" section, or maybe add a "Seriously Completely Pants-On-Head Retarded" section to put it in. You don't have to attend Absolute Airsoft to lose an eye (although it helps).
  2. This advert is COMPLETED!

    • For sale
    • Used

    For sale is a KSC System 7 SIG Sauer SIG Pro 2022. Long out of production (though some spare parts and magazines are still available), this pistol is extremely rare. The only other SP2022 replica is a KWC NBB. This is an Asian-market replica with full SIG trademarks, and all of the even rarer upgrades for this platform: A Volante Airsoft complete hop-up/inner barrel assembly. This is vastly superior to the standard unit in range, accuracy and not un-setting itself at random. It has an improved nub and bucking, and a stainless-steel inner barrel. A Shooters Design aluminium slide and outer barrel kit, CNC'd from billet. This has full SIG trademarks and is exceptionally rare. This pistol is in mint condition; I have shot less than 100 rounds through it. It comes in its original retail packaging, accompanied by three magazines, a hop-up adjustment tool and the manual. It is in full working order. This pistol retailed (when available) in the EU for approximately £155, the slide and outer barrel kit retailed (when available) for approximately £135, the hop-up kit for approximately £35, and the spare magazines for approximately £26 each for a total retail value of £377. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

    £200

    London, Greater London - GB

  3. > Run by the same bloke as SAS > Someone had their eye shot out in the safe zone > No chronograph This deal is getting worse all the time!
  4. I dunno about that. Several of the people convicted of planning acts of terrorism have been members of these little clubs, e.g. Jack Renshaw and numerous other members of National Action, and five members of the British branch of Atomwaffen. Letting oxygen thieves gang up seems to be proving a problem globally. I think my favourite is the reaction of the neighbours of Darren Osborne (perpetrator of the 2017 Finsbury Mosque vehicle attack). A neighbour who wished to remain anonymous opined that "He’s always been a complete cunt but this is really surprising."
  5. VFC have just announced an MG4. There is obviously the gorgeous, albeit very elderly, Inokatsu FN MAG and M240. You can still easily get the significantly less expensive "Echo1" M240. I'd kill for a GBB Mini-14. If GHK's quality control and manufacturing departments could get their f***ing act together that'd be great too.
  6. This advert is COMPLETED!

    • For sale
    • Used

    Genuine Laser Products handguard for Remington 870. A SureFire 618, from before SureFire was SureFire. Early 1990s vintage with pre-knurling lamp assembly; this thing is so old that it has a Laser Products-marked bulb. US police take-off with moderate wear, but fully functional. As usual with 618s the heatshrink over the tape switch perished; the previous owner repaired with a black caulk which works fine but is a bit scruffy. Price reflects this; I'm asking about half what one of these fetches in good condition. Perfect for SWAT impressions from the 1990-2000s. Drop-in fit for APS, Dominator, PPS (I think) and possibly others; other 870s can probably be modified to accept it, or this can be modified to fit them. £125 plus fees, UK shipping included. If you've any questions, please don't hesitate to ask.

    £125

    London - GB

  7. Without a doubt it has to be Erebor. It was a purpose-built (with what had to have been hundreds of thousands of pounds behind it) FIBUA site. It was in a huge warehouse with adjustable day-night cycles, the (multi-storey!) buildings were all individually lit with light switches and stuff, there was a modicum of furniture, the safe zone was brand-spanking new and the marshalling was top-notch. Not to mention it was reachable by Underground... Closure was an incalculable loss for London airsofters in particular and airsoft in general. 😢 Man, I loathed this site. I only played it once and that was more than enough to make it repetitive. I found it so confined that we were barely able to get out of our spawns before getting absolutely annihilated, and the 0.5:1 scale meant I smashed my head on just about every lintel in the site.
  8. I don't really agree with this assessment. The biggest problem, as you have correctly identified, is that players' information is not well recorded, very infrequently updated, and not properly accessible. A more advanced system which automated more of these tasks would be a huge boon to the airsoft community. I am envisioning a smartphone app and website. First how it works for UKARA: UKARA creates a database which is capable of creating and storing (in a GDPR-compliant fashion, obviously) profiles for retailers, sites and players. UKARA creates a web portal, with online forms, through which retailers, sites and players can fill out their information, upload supporting documentation, and view their own profile (and others', but only once the other has consented to the release only of the required information for each individual request). UKARA dedicates staff to manage the database and review information supplied by retailers, sites and players on initial application, and a periodic basis thereafter. Then how it works for sites: The site registers with UKARA via an online form, and uploads its contact details and insurance information. This is manually inspected by UKARA staff. A site profile is created by said staff, and the details of the insurance and its expiry date logged against the site's entry in the UKARA backend. When the expiry date nears the site owner is independently notified by UKARA that its continued eligibility is contingent on supply of updated insurance documents. The site is responsible for updating UKARA as to any change in its circumstances, e.g. if it closes or opens a new location, which would be manually reviewed by UKARA staff. Each location has a unique entry in the UKARA backend. The site installs an app on a "site" smartphone, tablet etc., and logs in to the site's profile within the app. This app uses NFC, or scans a QR code, or similar to communicate with a player's smartphone. This doesn't need to have live internet connectivity - the app can just upload data to the UKARA database the next time it is connected to the internet. The only time it would need immediate access to the database would be to check a player's eligibility for an in-person purchase of a RIF on-site. This could also be of use to the site in other ways, e.g. establishing whether a player has already signed and completed the site's own insurance waivers etc. by logging that as an entry on the players' profile which is only viewable as a yes/no answer and only requestable by that site's app. It also removes from the site the current burden of manually entering (and updating, etc.) players' details on UKARA's system. Then how it works for the player: The player registers a profile with UKARA. The usual details - profile picture, name, address, age etc. - are supplied via an online application. The player uploads their proofs of age, address etc., all of which are manually reviewed by UKARA staff. A player profile is created by said staff, and the player's details logged against this entry. The player is responsible for updating their profile as to any change in circumstances, e.g. a change in address, which will be manually reviewed by UKARA staff and require the same proofs as the original application. The player installs an app on their smartphone, and logs in to their profile within the app. When the player attends a game, the app displays their profile picture to the site staff to confirm the player is using their own profile, and uses NFC, or presents a QR code, or similar, so that the site can scan their profile using the site smartphone. This doesn't need much work to be GDPR compliant - the site app only needs to log the player's attendance, not access their personal details. The app then logs the player's attendance at a game on their profile in the UKARA backend. The UKARA backend then adds the player's game to a rolling list of games played, and when a deadline of a year since the last game played approaches, the player is independently notified by UKARA that their continued eligibility is contingent on playing a game soon. This has a significant benefit for players, who can now play at any registered site and have that logged as a game played on their profile. No more having to attend one site three times every twelve months, because your continued participation is logged every time you play at any site. How it works for buying and selling: Once a player has a profile, the UKARA backend can supply information on the player's eligibility. A retailer can register a profile on the UKARA backend using the usual online form, supplying the appropriate contact details and insurance information. When a buyer wants to purchase a gun, the app can supply a yes/no answer as to their eligibility to purchase a RIF (or an IF, for that matter; they only need their profile to confirm they're over 18 for that and it can of course automatically update to eligible after a suitable number of games within a suitable period) to the seller. When a request is made by a seller - whether that's a retailer or another player - to confirm the buyer's eligibility, the buyer is asked whether they consent to the distribution of their details to the seller. For an in-person purchase the app might display the player's name, profile picture and eligibility status so the seller can confirm the buyer's identify and eligibility. For a delivery purchase the app might display the player's name, address and eligibility status, so the seller can confirm the buyer's eligibility, and that they're delivering to an address which matches the buyer's profile. If a sale is made, the seller could log a unique ID (e.g. one assigned to the request they used to confirm the buyer's details) against the details of the sale (in their POS software, or in a record book or something) so they could confirm in the future that they checked the buyer's eligibility before they sold to the buyer, which is the literal form of a s.38 defence. This includes importation. Border Force can request a player's information (name, address, eligibility status) when they detain an imported gun, to confirm those details match a registered player's profile. This would vastly speed up situations where a player's status is unclear and Border Force detains the gun until they're sure everything is in order. I mean... Isn't the whole point of an API to access data? At this point you're more picking holes in the technological implementation than the fundamental idea, which seems to me to be perfectly sound.
  9. This doesn't seem radically different from UKARA in concept. The "BAC" now have to: Partner with as many airsoft sites as possible, which means reaching out to them and getting hold of their public liability insurance certificates, and Creating profiles for each site to access remotely, so they can affirm that a player was there at a specified date, and Partner with as many airsoft retailers as possible, which means reaching out to them all and, Creating profiles for each retailer to access remotely, so they can affirm a player's BAC details (number and address) are valid, and Persuading airsofters to use the system. They haven't exactly fallen at the first hurdle but they've not really got that many sites registered (as of yet), which defeats the point of being able to play at multiple sites. They have a reasonable number of retailers signed up, but that's not of much use if the players can't find a site to play at. Questions that will be asked: Who are the "BAC"? UKARA is at least an industry-backed body; the BAC lists a staff of two. (Further, why can't the "web development team" set up a proper e-mail address at their actual domain? What's with all the errors in the copy on the website? Why is the last update in the news section from 2018?) Where's the incentive for sites to give up the "guaranteed" business of forcing players to play three games at their site and/or their nifty sideline in selling players guns that they have to use three times at the site before they can keep them? Can we use a BAC number to import a RIF? 99% of the time these "UKARA alternatives" have been cooked up by total chancers as a way to sell guns to people who wouldn't have a hope of qualifying under the UKARA scheme. This one doesn't look as bad as they usually do, but this has a lot more "good idea" than "actually ready" written all over it, especially with so few sites signed up. This isn't a bad idea but a far better solution would be to put pressure on UKARA to update their system, IMO. UKARA is almost universally recognised and accepted, especially by Border Force. There is no compelling reason that UKARA can't create a Practiscore-style system where players can register their attendance at any number of events at any given venue.
  10. PureSilver

    ghk 553

    Interested in splitting off 3 of the magazines? I figure that'll bring the price down a bit for another purchaser, might make it a bit easier to shift the gun if it hasn't sold yet.
  11. Scorpion EVO. I have actually ridden to a skirmish with a gun in a rucksack before, and no prizes for guessing which gun I chose for a game where I wasn't going to be able to bring a backup.
  12. That's partially inaccurate. There is no minimum age limit to have a defence - if an 8-year-old played airsoft three times in two months at a site for which public liability insurance is held, he'd have the same defence as anyone else. The only differences are (a) he'd be too young to register that defence with UKARA, (b) because he's too young to buy any airsoft gun. As @Rogerborg says: There is nothing illegal about OP's father (over 18... I hope) purchasing an IF and gifting it to OP, OP playing (or having already played) his three games in two months to have a defence, and finally OP manufacturing a RIF by stripping the bright paint off his IF. As to whether or not this "person who doesn't have a defence purchasing a RIF to immediately gift to someone who does" is legitimate... I think there's an argument to be made that it could be. PatrolBase need to be able to show that they made the gun available for the purposes of airsoft, and if they know OP has a defence and but-for being a minor would be able to purchase a RIF himself, I think they could say that they made it available for that purpose. Whether or not they will do that - and I strongly suspect they won't - is up to them.
  13. Might be worth keeping an eye out for a Hephaestus Project T, I think that was well-regarded.
  14. This advert is COMPLETED!

    • For sale
    • Used

    For sale is a genuine select-fire AUG A1 stock and furniture in olive drab. This includes the stock, sling pin, buttpad and foregrip. These parts were made under license to Steyr by SME Ordnance for the Malaysian military. The rifle was replaced in Malaysian service by M4s, made under license to Colt by SME Ordnance, and the AUG A1s were surplussed. These parts are military surplus and exhibit the usual wear, but remain in full working order. These parts are weapon furniture, and are not controlled items in the UK. I will ship these items internationally, but only upon confirmation that it is legal for you to receive them. Purchase price of these parts exceeds £325. This furniture almost fits the GHK AUG GBBR - the receiver needs to be shaved about 0.5mm, likewise the bolt. The magazine fits the well and locks in correctly. Some work would be required to seat the trigger pack. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

    £200

    London - GB

  15. THIS ADVERT IS 'UNCOMPLETED' - THIS MEANS THE ADVERTISER HASN'T BUMPED THIS LISTING, BUT IT COULD STILL BE WORTH CONTACTING THEM.

    • Wanted
    • Used or as new

    I'm after a Wolverine Storm InGrip regulator and a Palmers Pursuit Micro Rock regulator. Used is fine if it's in full working order - I don't even need all the parts, so let me know what you've got.

    NO VALUE SPECIFIED

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