Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Asomodai

Airsoft Action Cam footage - Image stabilisation - Built in or post production?

This thread is over three months old. Please be sure that your post is appropriate as it will revive this otherwise old (and probably forgotten) topic.

Recommended Posts

Hello gents. 

 

I just picked up an Akaso EK7000 Action Cam. I accidentally picked up the model without image stabilisation. Though I hear the Pro version which does have it is not massively effective. 

 

I do have access to a fully paid up Adobe CC 2020 subscription through work. Is Image stabilisation made in post production with After Effects/Premiere better then built in camera image stabilisation?

 

Lastly, I have an Camera adapter for my helmet, but its made of plastic, will this be good enough or should I order one made of stronger material?

 

I also ordered a Plan Beta ICU 2 camera for selfies, unfortunately it came in with a leaky lipo battery, which I have had to order a replacement from China, quite a common problem, but luckily easy to install 😕

 

Cheers gents!

 

Rob. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey mate. If you’re looking to edit videos using Adobe Premier Pro then you’ll be using some serious computing power.

The issue with stabilisation in post is you have crop your image and then warp your footage to seem “stable”. It ends up looking like your recording is on a liquid.

 

in regard to preferring stabilisation at the camera or in post. I always aim to stabilise the camera as best as possible then any thing that’s still too bouncy or jittery then I use Adobe warp stabiliser.


 

your plastic mount is more than good enough it means your camera has a breakaway should you fall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, DopeYourScope said:

Hey mate. If you’re looking to edit videos using Adobe Premier Pro then you’ll be using some serious computing power.

The issue with stabilisation in post is you have crop your image and then warp your footage to seem “stable”. It ends up looking like your recording is on a liquid.

 

in regard to preferring stabilisation at the camera or in post. I always aim to stabilise the camera as best as possible then any thing that’s still too bouncy or jittery then I use Adobe warp stabiliser.


 

your plastic mount is more than good enough it means your camera has a breakaway should you fall.

 

I have 30 render farm server clients if I need it for processing. 

 

I doubt I would be able to stabilise the camera too much being a helmet mount only. So I guess I will be using post most of the time. Considering that is it better to record at a higher resolution at 30 FPS or 1080P at 60FPS? Considering the zooming in effect of warp stabiliser I would have thought higher resolution would be a better option to seem less grainy. 

 

I understand I have gone for a very cheap option, but I am not interested in doing Youtube quality clickbait style videos. Just for myself and maybe a site review or two. I just want it to be relatively view able at 1080p and for the camera not to break 1st skirmish out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah without spending GoPro amounts of money for good in-built camera stabilisation your best bet is stabilising in post. 
if you record at 2.7k (I assume that’s the higher resolution you mentioned) you’ll end up using more memory, if you’re willing to keep swapping cards then that’s your best bet.

if not just record at 1080, the crop factor isn’t massive but it can be noticeable.

 

the higher the frame rate the less motion-blur you have which is one of the reasons all movies are shot at 24fps because it gives that motion blur. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, DopeYourScope said:

the higher the frame rate the less motion-blur you have which is one of the reasons all movies are shot at 24fps because it gives that motion blur. 

 

With a few noticeable exceptions like the Hobbit films: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_films_with_high_frame_rates

 

Which made them look frankly weird.  Super sharp HD and HFR is also a nightmare for sets, costumes and makeup, as you see every piece of foam and polyester and wrinkle, even with a massive budget.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Rogerborg said:

 

With a few noticeable exceptions like the Hobbit films: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_films_with_high_frame_rates

 

Which made them look frankly weird.  Super sharp HD and HFR is also a nightmare for sets, costumes and makeup, as you see every piece of foam and polyester and wrinkle, even with a massive budget.


Wasn’t aware they were HFR, very interesting wonder why they made that choice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your head will give a degree of stabilisation - the human body is natures gimbal for the head.

Try some footage in a couple of frame rates and resolutions, with and without software stabilisation, and upload samples to YouTube.

Watch the results for the combined effect. A stabilised copy may look unnatural to the eye.

However - I hate video editing and leave such things to others in the team.

 

With regard to mounting it should be fine, but if you’re concerned then just add a tether wire, so if the mount fails the camera is still tied to your head instead of falling in a bush.

The main point is that if you use the sticky pads to fit mounts (which gives a tiny tiny degree of stabilisation) then ensure that sufficient time is left for the pad to ‘cure’.

If you aren’t using the pads then look for anywhere that you can drop in a slither of bicycle inner tube rubber remove ‘hard’ mounts.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This thread is over three months old. Please be sure that your post is appropriate as it will revive this otherwise old (and probably forgotten) topic.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...