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HELIflipper03

Best WW2 Airsoft gun?

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I know this is a pretty vague question, but I would love to hear about your experiences with some WW2 airsoft guns. I love the ww2 era and am looking to buying a gun. Personally, it's realism over practicality here, but I would be nice if it fired straight. My budget is nothing over £400. Any suggestions?

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I've heard good things about the ICS M1 Garand. 

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Would be easier finding a WW2 era weapon you like and then researching the best manufacturer or that particular model.

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The King Arms Thompson is a nice piece of kit, especially if you can get one with a real wood kit. Feels the part and shoots nice and straight. The only thing is the selector for fire mode gets a pretty loose due to the placement in relation to the gearbox, and mine doesn't like to stay in semi-auto. Not sure if that happens with all of them or not. Probably just needs a washer putting in or something.

 

Otherwise I've got a S&T Stirling which is a great gun for CQB. Very light and compact. Sturdy construction, feels good to shoot. Mags are expensive though and mine's recently decided it doesn't like semi-auto either (haven't had a chance to fix it yet though, might be something basic).

 

The only other one I've had experience with was the AGM Sten MkII. I'd say avoid that unless you really like Stens. No semi-auto or safety, everything starts getting loose very quickly. I ended up selling mine after two skirmishes.

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40 minutes ago, Greg147 said:

The King Arms Thompson is a nice piece of kit, especially if you can get one with a real wood kit. Feels the part and shoots nice and straight. The only thing is the selector for fire mode gets a pretty loose due to the placement in relation to the gearbox, and mine doesn't like to stay in semi-auto. Not sure if that happens with all of them or not. Probably just needs a washer putting in or something.

 

Otherwise I've got a S&T Stirling which is a great gun for CQB. Very light and compact. Sturdy construction, feels good to shoot. Mags are expensive though and mine's recently decided it doesn't like semi-auto either (haven't had a chance to fix it yet though, might be something basic).

 

The only other one I've had experience with was the AGM Sten MkII. I'd say avoid that unless you really like Stens. No semi-auto or safety, everything starts getting loose very quickly. I ended up selling mine after two skirmishes.

Wow thanks very much for the info! I'll keep that in mind, and I may buy a Thomson as a result.

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I had a King Arms Tommy with drum mag and it was very accurate in both senses of the word, real wood furniture and a wind up drum mag that I almost felt like getting a 1911 to go with it, would have complimented each other nicely.

Big, easy to wind and load magazine, not quite as easy to swing as a modern assault type weapon. It was a "gangster" model with a drum mag and forward grip but those were used in WW2.

 

I currently have the Webley MK6, (albeit in .177 rifled but I understand the airsoft is just the same but for bore). It is fantastic solid feeling, authentic and even comes with a repro 1930s British army training manual (invaluable for advice on mounted use. Airsoft cavalry anyone?) It is heavy, unergonomic and completely without styling, looks like a component for a Victorian bridge designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel and at the same weight as the Real Steel, feels like it. As it's a warmed up 19th C design none of that is surprising.

The nasty plastic grips are the only inauthentic aspect. It has a very high bore axis even by revolver standards and seems designed for those with big hands. Ergonomics? Comfort? Foreign rot man! Buck your ideas up, what!

They are of course WW1 but were, like the 1928 Thompson, used in WW2. Would suit a Home Guard load out maybe? As would the Tommy in fact.

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8 hours ago, Defender90 said:

I had a King Arms Tommy with drum mag and it was very accurate in both senses of the word, real wood furniture and a wind up drum mag that I almost felt like getting a 1911 to go with it, would have complimented each other nicely.

Big, easy to wind and load magazine, not quite as easy to swing as a modern assault type weapon. It was a "gangster" model with a drum mag and forward grip but those were used in WW2.

 

I currently have the Webley MK6, (albeit in .177 rifled but I understand the airsoft is just the same but for bore). It is fantastic solid feeling, authentic and even comes with a repro 1930s British army training manual (invaluable for advice on mounted use. Airsoft cavalry anyone?) It is heavy, unergonomic and completely without styling, looks like a component for a Victorian bridge designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel and at the same weight as the Real Steel, feels like it. As it's a warmed up 19th C design none of that is surprising.

The nasty plastic grips are the only inauthentic aspect. It has a very high bore axis even by revolver standards and seems designed for those with big hands. Ergonomics? Comfort? Foreign rot man! Buck your ideas up, what!

They are of course WW1 but were, like the 1928 Thompson, used in WW2. Would suit a Home Guard load out maybe? As would the Tommy in fact.

that amazing. Thanks so much for the advice!

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