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curious_about_airsoft

Question about the VCRA

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Hi everyone,

 

I bought an airsoft RIF pistol on Facebook from a buying and selling group, before I was aware of the VCRA and the requirements associated with it. The seller asked for no UKARA number or defence or anything like that, I just paid them through paypal and they posted it to me.

 

I now have in my possession an all black airsoft pistol. I don't plan on using it anywhere outside of my house or back garden and won't be skirmishing until I can afford to buy a full sized rifle.

 

Under the VCRA have I or am I committing an offence in possessing an RIF? I'm trying to find an answer, as I don't want to get into any trouble.

 

Like I said, I'm not planning on committing any crimes with it, and won't be running around with it in public.

 

Can anyone help me?

 

Many thanks.

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Only illegal if your under 18, if your over then its the seller thats broken the law.

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Then ownership of a RIF isnt illegal if you are 19 at the time of sale. As Mack said, the seller has broken the law.

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Then ownership of a RIF isnt illegal if you are 19 at the time of sale. As Mack said, the seller has broken the law.

Gotcha. Suppose the police see it or find it for whatever reason, what would happen? (I've not got a criminal record or anything like that). Just checking there's absolutely no chance I'd get into trouble.

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Gotcha. Suppose the police see it or find it for whatever reason, what would happen? (I've not got a criminal record or anything like that). Just checking there's absolutely no chance I'd get into trouble.

 

Wouldn't worry about it.

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Do you know what [brand] you bought? Some pistols are viable for skirmishing indoors. Certainly give you a taste for the sport without spending more money. :)

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Wouldn't worry about it.

 

Like Monty says: No need to worry - just tell them it's a toy and they'll be on their way. The worst that can happen is they get a firearms officer to confirm it's a toy.

 

Just out of curiosity, I'm assuming blank firing pistols also come under the VCRA as RIF's too? Would they be treated in the same way?

 

Do you know what [brand] you bought? Some pistols are viable for skirmishing indoors. Certainly give you a taste for the sport without spending more money. :)

 

KWA I think. It's a glock.

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The vast majority of Police Officers will not know the details of the VCRA in relation to airsoft weapons. In fact, I would suggest that a lot of Police Officers don't know about the VCRA at all.

 

Unless you go out of your way to draw attention to what has occurred then the authorities (i.e. the Police) won't be interested at all.

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The vast majority of Police Officers will not know the details of the VCRA in relation to airsoft weapons. In fact, I would suggest that a lot of Police Officers don't know about the VCRA at all.

 

Unless you go out of your way to draw attention to what has occurred then the authorities (i.e. the Police) won't be interested at all.

 

I do! and so do several other people on my team at work, but then again i am here and those several other people also make up our fledgling airsoft team.

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I do! and so do several other people on my team at work, but then again i am here and those several other people also make up our fledgling airsoft team.

Hey, you're probably the best person to ask about this then:

 

In terms of the VCRA, what's the law with regards to being in possession of a blank firing RIF? Is it the same as an airsoft pistol (i.e legal to own, but not to take in public?)

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Police officers are not lawyers!

 

Also the answer depends on whether the blank firing gun in question can, or cannot, be converted to fire life ammunition.

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Police officers are not lawyers!

 

Also the answer depends on whether the blank firing gun in question can, or cannot, be converted to fire life ammunition.

I don't recall saying that they were! I merely stated he'd be the best person to ask, since he said that he knew about the VCRA and may therefore be the most knowledgeable person to ask on this forum.

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You're not giving enough information. For starters possession is too ambiguous. Not to mention intent is most of the law, strict liability offences are few - and without other information it appears to be those you're asking about.

 

So it depends on whether the gun in question is convertible, and whether it is of a type requiring a license.

 

Now if you mean in the street, it still matter which law it's covered under and that depends upon whether it falls under the firearms acts (which, with case law and other documents, provide definitions for whether it will or not) or the VCRA.

 

If it can't fire real lethal ammunition, or be made to do so, it's just a RIF like any other.

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TBH guys I haven't really looked into the legality of blank firing guns as i only know mostly about the VCRA in terms of Airsoft like most of you.

 

Now if your asking me to trawl the legal database about this then you will need to seek a lawyer, trust me the database is huge and is never black and white with various laws contradicting each other and amendment after amendment, trust me even most officers struggle to keep up with the changes.

 

That aside I believe that if you wish to purchase a blank firer then you are perfectly entitled to, I don't know if there is a minimum age requirement but would at a guess say that there probably is and that it is set at 18 and above, likelihood is that the blank firer must be of a two tone colour such as bright orange if purchased after the VCRA was put in place, those purchased prior to the VCRA may be of a normal gun colour.

 

An example of the above is the Bruni Gap 8mm blank firing Glock pistols, prior to VCRA they were black but afterwards good luck finding one not fully bright orange, I purchased one many years ago prior to VCRA for Air Training Corps use and it is fully black, though now it never leaves my house.

 

The only blank firer you cannot own is the Bruni Olympic .380 Blank firing revolver as that is readily convertible.

 

Please note guys don't take my word for gospel as like most PCs i only have a working knowledge of the law

 

Lastly don't take and wave any of your guns around blanks or Airsoft ones heck even cap guns and cheapo crappy toy ones for kids, the UK public are so jittery around guns they call us saying shots fired when the likelihood was a car engine misfiring or some boy racers silly exhaust.

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Talking about the public being jittery, I saw traders selling toy MP5s at War and Peace for £10.

 

Close up they were smaller than the real thing and had an orange tip, but one father adminished his two sons for "shooting" people in the queue.

 

No one takes any notice at W&P but I wonder what those eight year olds will be doing with those in the school holidays.

 

On a lighter note, it did amuse me to see three slightly older kids having a mock battle with their M4s in the foreground of the WW2 renactment battle. Fighting that close to a Sherman was probably too good an opportunity to miss.

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