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Oshia

Battery question.

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I'm looking at buying a APS ASR 110 as a starting block for a DMR, can you tell me if I can use my 7.4v 2600mAh Li-Po in it, and remove the fuse and change to deans connectors?
I am fine working with cosmetics, but I'm useless when it comes to electronics.
Also, does anybody have any idea what springs are in these rifles out of the box?

Cheers.

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A fuse by definition has high resistance. If it didn't, it wouldn't get hot and break when needed. Some people consider it worth while to remove it and take the risk.

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I know what a fuse is bud, A lot of people told me they aren't necessary?
Thats the least of my worries :) I need to know about the battery and deans connectors.

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I would honestly leave the fuse in just to be on the safe side forever :D

 

and i'm not sure that battery would fit in the stock... it may be too fat.... get a nun chuck battery

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The Li-Po is very small compared, it fits in the handguard of my Masada, and there isnt much room in there at all!

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Nevermind folks I'll ask the guys at our next game :P

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my Umarex Mini Patriot (which is an APS gun) loves the 7.4 LiPo, it also loves the 11.1 LiPo I have recently got for it. New APS guns come fitted with a mosfet which on mine holds the fuse too, I'd not de-fuse it as the mosfet is great!

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Its a small circuit board that you wire into the circuitry of the gun. Commonly they send a smaller voltage to the trigger just to detect when its pulled and then switch the power to the motor electronically. This improves trigger response and reduces damage to the trigger contacts from using higher voltage batteries.

There are other varieties of mosfet that do things like add a 3 round burst etc.

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I'm all new to this May I ask what a MOSFET is

A mosfet basically decreases the resistance or something like that which stops carbon building up on the trigger contacts , especially when using semi auto. This can help to increase the longevity of the rifle.

It can also increase trigger response times and give you a better ROF.

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an electric magic box that improves trigger response, stops arcing on trigger contacts among other things.... expensive ones can be programmed with pre-cocking, 3-shot burst, semi only, active braking etc.

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Are these costly to buy and fit

Not sure on prices, but you can get a plug and play mosfet which connects to the battery. Or there's one in which you have to solder to certain parts of the gun, which is not expensive but may be tricky for someone who has never done it before.

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Some of the better mosfets require the gearbox casings to be altered as well, fine to use a lipo in that gun, don't make work for yourself on something that may well not need it

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7.4v to start with, if upgrading to a hi-torque motor then poss venture to an 11.1v

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A mosfet basically decreases the resistance or something like that which stops carbon building up on the trigger contacts , especially when using semi auto. This can help to increase the longevity of the rifle.

It can also increase trigger response times and give you a better ROF.

 

Yyyyeeeeeeaaahhhhhh...that's not quite right.

 

In a traditionally wired AEG the battery negative goes to the negative side of the motor and the positive side of the circuit is completed through the trigger contacts. Usually this is a simple copper wiper type switch which makes when the trigger is pulled. Particularly with upgraded weapons with a high current draw this basic type of switch can arc which leaves carbon deposits on the contacts which results (ultimately) in failure of the trigger contacts. A "MOSFET" is in fact a type of transistor. This transistor acts as a power switch and is where the device fitted to AEGs gets its name from. Basically the circuit takes the wiring from the battery away from the trigger contacts, these wires are then replaced with smaller wires. The trigger becomes a low voltage switch and the transistor in the MOSFET unit delivers the power directly to the motor. This removes the likelihood of arcing at the trigger contacts extending their lifespan and also has the benefit that a MOSFET transistor has a much sharper ON/OFF transition than the metal trigger contacts which gives you a better trigger response. Unless your trigger contacts are particularly poor a MOSFET is unlikely to give you drastically higher rate of fire though.

 

More complex MOSFET units have additional functions such as active braking eg the Gate NanoAB (which forces the motor to stop spinning resulting in less overrun) or can be programmed to give burst fire eg the ASCU 3.

 

Unless you're going to seriously upgrade the power of the weapon or you are having an issue with overrun then you probably don't NEED a MOSFET unit, but they are quite nice if you intend to get one with flashy extras.

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Yyyyeeeeeeaaahhhhhh...that's not quite right.

 

In a traditionally wired AEG the battery negative goes to the negative side of the motor and the positive side of the circuit is completed through the trigger contacts. Usually this is a simple copper wiper type switch which makes when the trigger is pulled. Particularly with upgraded weapons with a high current draw this basic type of switch can arc which leaves carbon deposits on the contacts which results (ultimately) in failure of the trigger contacts. A "MOSFET" is in fact a type of transistor. This transistor acts as a power switch and is where the device fitted to AEGs gets its name from. Basically the circuit takes the wiring from the battery away from the trigger contacts, these wires are then replaced with smaller wires. The trigger becomes a low voltage switch and the transistor in tthe MOSFET unit delivers the power directly to the motor. This removes the likelihood of arcing at the trigger contacts extending their lifespan and also has the benefit that a MOSFET transistor has a much sharper ON/OFF transition than the metal trigger contacts which gives you a better trigger response. Unless your trigger contacts are particularly poor a MOSFET is unlikely to give you drastically higher rate of fire though.

 

More complex MOSFET units have additional functions such as active braking eg the Gate NanoAB (which forces the motor to stop spinning resulting in less overrun) or can be programmed to give burst fire eg the ASCU 3.

 

Unless you're going to seriously upgrade the power of the weapon or you are having an issue with overrun then you probably don't NEED a MOSFET unit, but they are quite nice if you intend to get one with flashy extras.

So I know what it does, trigger contacts etc. But I don't know how it does it? Sounds about right with my poor airsoft vocabulary :)

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metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOSFET

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transistor

 

A transistor is a semi-conductor device used to amplify and switch electronic signals and power.

 

It uses a small control voltage to switch on and off a larger power voltage.As already posted a high voltage or current across a conventional metal contact switch can cause arcing that damages the switch contacts and can cause a drop in voltage.

Transistors are 'solid state' they don't have any physical metal contacts so their operation is faster and there is no arcing.

 

In Airsoft terms a 'Mosfet' is actually a small device made up of several components sometimes on a small circuit board, sometimes just encapsulated in shrink wrap. One or more of the components in the device is an actual MOSFET.

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So I know what it does, trigger contacts etc. But I don't know how it does it? Sounds about right with my poor airsoft vocabulary :)

basically, if you wire it all up, the trigger contacts become a switch.

 

Think of it like a TV and a TV remote. The mosfet is like the tv remote and the TV uses the mains as a power supply.

 

So a Tv remote uses 2 AA batteries. They add up to 3 volts, not that much.

 

A TV, uses the mains which is 230V, and that 230v goes directly to the TV (then a transformer will step down the voltage to some lower number but you don't need to know that)

 

3 volts compared to 230v is not much. But is it enough to control the TV with the remote.

 

SO the trigger contracts become low powered like the TV remote and the motor takes on the full 7.4v or 11.1v from the battery and the trigger contacts tell it to turn on or off, like a tv remote; it can turn a TV on or off using a voltage supply.

 

That somewhat how a mosfet works. But if want to get into detail, click the spoiler.

 

 

So, a mosfet has a magnet in it (i think, i'm not too sure), 2 electrodes either side.

I think they require 2.4v generally to turn on but when it is turned on, the magnet will attract electrons inside it and it will all stick to the magnet in a very fine line, essentially making connecting the electrodes together like a bridge. This bridge allows electricity (flow of electrons) to pass through it and power your airsoft gun motor.

 

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So, a mosfet has a magnet in it (i think, i'm not too sure), 2 electrodes either side.

I think they require 2.4v generally to turn on but when it is turned on, the magnet will attract electrons inside it and it will all stick to the magnet in a very fine line, essentially making connecting the electrodes together like a bridge. This bridge allows electricity (flow of electrons) to pass through it and power your airsoft gun motor.

 

[electronics engineer]HHHNNNNGGGGNNGNGGGGGG!!![/electronics engineer]

 

You're just trying to give me an aneurysm now, aren't you? ;)

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