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Chippins

Splinter Camo.

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I fairly sure they did, it used to be an old German and maybe DDR camo if I remember right.. It was developed in 1920s and called Splittertarnmuster. It and variations were used in bits in WWII

 

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Cheers for the german name for it, but still no luck, the colsest I have found to any real applications of this particular colour scheme is this tent, loads of the tundra type colours worn by the east germans after the war but so far no luck on an ochre coloured BDU

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The reason you'll find it hard to find BDUs in it as no ones really made it since it was issued, you're best bet is having a look at a few cold war or WWII places as they be able to help

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Yeah, its a shame, Germans make the nicest camo, even pretty much invented A-TACS :lol:

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even pretty much invented A-TACS :lol:

 

Please do elaborate!?!?!

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Uses the same sort of smudge distortion that A-TACS uses, admittedly in a much more crude manner. If this wasnt the insperation for the design I'd be suprised.

 

Edit: though I do realise that my previous statement does seem a little sensationalist in retrospect. :huh:

post-4634-0-16837100-1360198456_thumb.jpg

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While I see what you mean... yea not really...

 

A-TACS isn't a smudgy pattern, blurry yes but the way its made means its certainly not smudgy. Its made by arranging organic pixels into certain patterns, if you look at it very closely its actually incredibly detailed and the pattern is specifically arranged in certain ways to be more effective. It also doesn't have lots of little lines across it.

 

I will however admit that FG does look a lot like the camo used by the rebels in Return of the Jedi...

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I didn't ever notice that with the rebels, and I didn’t realise the purpose of the shapes in A-TACS, I had always assumed that the idea was to break up your silhouette in a manner that makes you look 'out of focus', for lack of a better expression, thus blending you in with your surroundings. I had no idea that the patterns imitated naturally occurring structures, though having taken a second look it is far more prominent in the standard pattern than in the FG, you learn something new every day.

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Haha, yea a lot of science went in to A-TACS. Every colour was taken from nature as well, so you don't just have the standard OD or CT colours

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Nick, what do you do all day?

 

Are there mini, edible encyclopaedias out there that are specifically about camo? You must just sit and eat them all day.

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Nick, what do you do all day?

 

Are there mini, edible encyclopaedias out there that are specifically about camo? You must just sit and eat them all day.

 

Good question!

 

There are a few but they're pretty crap.. hit and miss on what infor they give. The best is actually wikipedia but that only has the main ones like UCP, DPM, Multicam etc.

Also none of them have anything on A-TACS.. all my knowledge from that is from reading the A-TACS web and facebook pages

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Cheers for the german name for it, but still no luck, the colsest I have found to any real applications of this particular colour scheme is this tent, loads of the tundra type colours worn by the east germans after the war but so far no luck on an ochre coloured BDU

 

That zelt was an experimental one, very very rare. The SS tended to go with a summer/ autumn side for their camo, until the dot pattern and liebermuster (essentially what alpineflauge is derived from). Heer and Luftwaffe splinter had a slight more subdued green side and variations between the two services pattern too. 1950's West germany still used a variation of splinter and the borderguards used sumpftarn.

 

The smock "Nicona" shows is the Bulgarian Coldwar era splinter, the night camo T-shirt is a made up one. Liebermuster was a true day/night camo as it was inpregnated with charcol against early night vision devices used at the end of WW2 .

 

Even more like Atacs is the blured edge oakleaf camos in some ways same idea of smudging you into the background.

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