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cairean

Going from a Ni-Mh to a lipo

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Ok so i wont to change my battery to a lipo but i want to know if i swap to a 7.4 lipo will damage the motor, The gun which i use is a G&G Mp5a4, its currently running on a NI-MH 9.6v 3300 mah battery, i would guess it would be fine to swap it to a 7.4 lipo but whats the highest volt lipo battery i could without killing of the motor?

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7.4 is what you want. An 11.1 would work for a while until you're gearbox failed

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only thing i can say is don't cheap out on the battery's or the charger

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Go straight to LiFe Po 9.9v, obviously you'll have to shop round, Component Shop may have them in stock again now or Ebay.

 

As Charlieairsoft says don't skimp on the charger.

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Batteries are batteries in the sense that the V and mAh are what's important. If its running 9+ volts now

It will run 9+ v on a diff type of battery.

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Charger wise you cant go wrong with the Imax B6. will charge 99% of battery types.

 

I run my guns on 7.4 Lipo and have never had an issue.

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Motors only draw the amps they need so you don't really need to worry about burning it out. What you need to consider when choosing a battery us how well your gun is internally tuned. If it's stock it's best to stick to 9.6v nimhs or 7.4v 20C lipos for the sake of longevity.

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Motors only draw the amps they need so you don't really need to worry about burning it out. What you need to consider when choosing a battery us how well your gun is internally tuned. If it's stock it's best to stick to 9.6v nimhs or 7.4v 20C lipos for the sake of longevity.

 

Actually, for the motor, lower voltage is worse. The higher the voltage, the faster the motor spins. Your motor relies on the rotation of the rotor to provide airflow to cool the windings (which are heated due to the current flow). Of course, if you are to increase the motor rotation speed (and hence ROF) you need to be sure that your gearbox etc. is capable of withstanding the greater loadings applied.

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Actually, for the motor, lower voltage is worse. The higher the voltage, the faster the motor spins. Your motor relies on the rotation of the rotor to provide airflow to cool the windings (which are heated due to the current flow). Of course, if you are to increase the motor rotation speed (and hence ROF) you need to be sure that your gearbox etc. is capable of withstanding the greater loadings applied.

 

Well I never said "lower voltage is better" and in any case the voltages I recommended are nowhere near low enough to cause the problems you speak off. Also, the voltage doesn't ultimately dictate how fast the motor will spin, it's the overall spec of the battery i.e. mah and c ratings. You can get yourself an 11.1v 1700mah 10c battery and it'll just barely outperform a good quality 9.6v 1600mah NIMH. Particularly when it comes to lipos, the C rating along with the MAH capacity determines the amps output which obviously determines how effectively your battery cycles current through the circuit and feeds the motor.

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