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BrutalLemon

Battery Modification

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So..after careful deliberation, I bought a bigger battery for my Cybergun M4A1. I wanted a 12v which it apparently takes according to the manual. I would of bought Cybergun battery-packs but they make it so hard to find in this goddamn country I gave up and got a racing pack one of componentshop.

 

And guess what...it doesn't fit.

 

Is it possible to take out some of the smaller batteries inside to make 7 for a 8.4V which the AEG also takes? Or is that silly?

 

Any ideas on what 12v type this AEG takes? I know there is a type called "nunchuck" or sumin? <_<

 

Any help would be huuuuugely appreciated because Cybergun suck.

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Modifying the battery packs we use is technically illegal and dangerous, I had a broken battery once and thought I'd remove a cell to take it from 8.4v to 7.2v and managed to set it on fire. So don't do that, my house stunk like burned plastic for ages.

 

Next up, I would avoid running any AEG on something that was 12v, especially something branded as cybergun if you don't know the manufacturer behind it.

 

If it's got a full stock, you want a large type battery, if it's got a crane stock then it's nunchuck type, and if it takes batteries in the handguard it wants a small.

 

Componentshop used to sell all three!

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You should avoid running swiss cheese on a 12v...

If you really want 12v, put a car battery in a rucksack and some jump leads connected to your motor! :P

 

(Seriously, no, that's a bad idea!)

 

Don't modify, just do some research (Google is your friend) and next time CHECK the dimensions of the battery BEFORE buying it! :P

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just get a battery pouch and a cable extender and connect it to the outside of the handguard or stock depending on how your gun is wired

 

Thanks for this! I'm going to look into getting a fake mag to hold the battery.

 

And for the other guys...the manual for the AEG says it can take 12V battery. But it's a handguard battery bay. I don't really know what to do. It should fit 12v.

I should of measured the battery compartment before buying but just didn't realise it's such a pain in the arse to buy them.

 

Thanks anyways guys

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There's no reason at all that you shouldn't modify NiCd or NiMH battery packs, so long as you understand what you are about. For instance, when you are soldering it, be aware that there is the potential for an electrical circuit to be formed both via or including the soldering iron, so make sure that the battery is electrically isolated, particularly that the pole which you're not soldering isn't making a connection with anything conductive.

 

It probably goes without saying, but, just in case, I will say: you should be careful not to heat batteries up much with the soldering iron or you may damage them. If you're not au fait with how to use a soldering iron, what you want to do is make sure that both the battery terminal and whatever you intend to attach to the battery is already "tinned", ie covered sufficiently in solder, but without any huge blobs. To tin the battery you have no choice but to heat the terminal, but the trick is to do it only once. Apply the flat of the iron to the terminal just off centre for 3-5 seconds then press the solder to the terminal, in the centre, next to the iron and touching the side of it. The solder should immediately melt. Remove the iron leaving a small amount of solder stuck to the battery. If you don't get it first time, allow the battery time to cool thoroughly before trying again. If you try several times and don't get it, try sanding the surface of the terminal to make it rough/take any coating off it and then have another go. Next, use long nosed pliers to hold the tinned part of the connector firmly against the tinned part of the battery terminal and press the soldering iron against the back of the connector for long enough to melt the solder. Immediately remove the iron and hold the connector in place for a moment until the solder hardens again. Voila!

 

I'd leave LiPo's alone if I were you...

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Whilst possible, I wouldn't go messing with nimh packs either. I don't generally have a problem with electronics and set to work to rearrange the layout of one of my packs. Before I'd even started to chop them up and reorganise them, the pack became ludicrously hot. I can only assume I was somehow shorting the pack against itself but I'm still not sure how I could have done this. I took it outside and lobbed it as far as I could for fear of it blowing up :lol:

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That'll be because the whole casing of the battery, apart from the positive terminal which is isolated by a plastic washer, is connected to the negative terminal, Dev. Did it have flat strap-type connectors between the cells too? These easily twist ad scratch through any paint to make a short circuit...

 

Like I said, isolating any cellls you're going to work with first is the only way forward. That doesn't mean clipping each of them away from their connectors, just stretching them apart so you can clearly see air between any parts that shouldn't touch each other. Clamps always come in handy...

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It did have that style of connector.. I can't understand how them scratching where they were already connected to be of issue though? Maybe I'm thoroughly confused as to how these packs work.

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It was probably one or more shorts between the strap and the very top of the case, just beyond the terminal that it was soldered to. I've had the same thing happen to the rechargeable battery packs inside electronic instruments that keep the machine code memory instantly available.

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Finius, would you like to explain how me taking apart and putting back together something that belongs to me is in any way illegal, technically or otherwise.

 

It might be a bad idea, if you're not au-fait with good soldering technique, or handling battery cells, but illegal it most certainly isn't!

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Thanks for this! I'm going to look into getting a fake mag to hold the battery.

 

And for the other guys...the manual for the AEG says it can take 12V battery. But it's a handguard battery bay. I don't really know what to do. It should fit 12v.

I should of measured the battery compartment before buying but just didn't realise it's such a pain in the arse to buy them.

 

Thanks anyways guys

A 12v NiMh battery will have 10 cells.

Maybe the problem you have is that you're using a 12v battery with high capacity cells?

What is the capacity of the battery? Would smaller cells help?

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