Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/01/15 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    Airsoft-Ed

    The GBBR Thread

    I'm loving how this has turned out, really picked up right off the bat, it's great! Might simplify my L85 review and think about doing a second video covering the more general GBBR questions, might as well get a bit more mileage out of the topic with video view counts and such, especially since most people won't have the attention span for a video the length it would take to cover all these interesting questions in an acceptable level of detail as well as a specific rifle review. I really hate skimping out on the finer points for the sake of keeping stuff concise. Anyway though, I'll try to give an answer for everything people have said so far: Getting used to the lower capacity: Personally this was never an issue for me, prior to buying my WE L85, I had an ICS one which I would run with real cap mags anyway. I actually decided to take the plunge with the WE because I figured I treated the ICS one as if it were realistic, handicapping myself with the ammo count in the process, so I might as well ditch it and go gas so the handicap was less of a choice and the rifle was more realistic in general. If that makes sense? I don't think it's really about getting used to it though. If you know you have less, you just use less ammo, it's not really a case of adjusting, it just happens. It's like when I use high caps, I go ape shit. I don't use barely any ammo just because I'm used to 30 rounders, if I know I've got loads, I'll use loads. If I know I've got hardly anything, I'll use hardly anything lol. How many mags do I use? I have 10, but I only actually bought 6 - One came with the gun, and I bought 5 with it. I then gained 10 more by trading all my old AEG spares for WE parts and related items because I had no need for the AEG bits anymore. 16 is too many. My rig can carry them, but as I said above, when you know you've not got a lot of ammo, you just don't use it. I've gone entire games with 1 mag before and done work. I actually sold 6 of the mags off because I didn't feel they were needed, I'll carry 10 into each game but I barely ever use more than half, even if the games go on for 40 minutes or more. I think I'd manage with 4, which is actually what I'm thinking of doing once I get a GBB M4, so I can run a much lower profile rig with it. But yeah, I've played entire games on 1 mag before, check out this video from the first game I ever played - No reload but I think I got about 8 kills, played proper aggressive too. What kind of sites do I play at? I am generally more of a CQB player, I find that gas guns can get by in more open settings, but they're not ideal... In a lot of woodland sites there are a lot of engagements that get started due to speculation; by this I mean, you'll see a dude through a bush and go for it. If you do this with a gas rifle, you don't really have the ammo to risk it. 'Cos if you don't get through with 30 shots, chances are the enemy's going to have 400 or so, and they are going to get through at some point. The range and accuracy issues aren't so much a problem as the ammo ones in woodland sites. In CQB it's all quick snappy peak wars where you have cover good enough for reloads to not hugely disadvantage you, and your trigger response will aid you a lot. I would definitely say gas rifles are better suited, or perhaps more fun to use in CQB, but they can still be used in woodland you'd just have to approach it with more of a stealthy, sniper-type mindset than that of a blasé run and gunner. Accuracy compared to AEGs: As I touched on above, it's not really something that can be talked about, it's a bit like asking what the accuracy of an AEG M4 is compared to a different brand of AEG M4. Think of it like this: The accuracy is more or less the same. The difference is that if you miss and have to fire more, the more it takes you to hit, the more in the shit you are, because you'll have to reload sooner. With an AEG, you care less about missing because chances are, 20 shots isn't a lot of ammo to you, so you can happily spam away until you hear "HIT!" your mags weigh next to nothing and can hold several times the quantity of ammo as a gas rifle user's mags. With a gas gun, using 30 round mags, more than 7 shots going down range for one target feels like too much, if I can't dispatch a target in 7 shots and they're a significant threat from the position they're in, it's time to get out of their way, or move in for a better angle. Do suppressors work? Nope. As with AEGs, the noise generated by the gun doesn't come from the muzzle, in AEGs it's the whir of the motor and the gears combined with the piston slapping home once it hits the cylinder head. With a gas rifle it comes from the big metal bolt smashing itself into your recoil spring, and then smashing itself into the face of your hop unit. That shit is loud. Only thing suppressors can work wonders for is HPA rifles, non-blowbacks, or if you build them right, spring snipers. Are GBBRs easy to customise internally? I would say yes, they're entirely mechanical, so once you understand how they work, it's clear and easy to understand what you can alter and what effect it will have. That said, there's less you can really do. In an AEG you can change the power, fit barrels and hop - Same with a GBBR... But, that's pretty much as far as GBBRs go, at least as long as your draw direct comparisons to AEGs. Gas rifle internals can't really be changed for more efficient/faster/smoother operation, well, they can... But you can't just buy the parts to make it so. So keeping it a bit more basic for the sake of this conversation: They just either work, or they don't work. So you can upgrade them for longevity, or leave them alone. You can tune them, but it's more of a DIY type of affair than just a case of buying a pre-made part and fitting it. That's where the understanding how they work part comes into it, you'll get more done with custom mods the better you understand the mechanism and how to alter it. You can make the bolt stroke shorter for higher rate of fire, or change the strength of the buffer spring for better gas efficiency for example. Maintenance: I think maintenance is a term that gets thrown about way too often in a negative way and it's really massively over exaggerated. If my rifle is working smoothly, I won't touch it. If it starts acting up, I'll open it up, check over the parts I think are to blame, and then I'll do what I can to make them work better. It's literally the same as an AEG... If something breaks, replace it. Boom. Gas guns are a lot easier to diagnose issues with and repair due to their mechanical nature, it's clear as day what the issue is because the way the gun fails to behave is basically a big neon sign saying "X part has failed!" in AEGs half the task can be guessing what's wrong before you open it up, one problem could be caused by several things. In a gas gun it's all a lot more clear cut, and taking them apart is a million times faster and easier too, so replacing any broken parts rarely takes more than 5 minutes unless it's to do with the trigger, which are more fiddly... I run my rifles dry, no lube on the moving parts, because it just attracts dust and grit and shit to stick itself all over them, since it's a lot easier for it to get in when there's a huge hole opening in the side of your gun every time you fire. In a year I have opened my L85 maybe 1 time to "maintain" it, which involved wiping a load of grit out from the inside after I'd played down and dirty in the woods and the whole of the inside of the receiver got caked in a fine layer of "wood dirt" as I call it. Aside from that it gets opened every time I get it out in order for me to set the NPAS and fiddle with the hop setting a bit. Brands to look at/avoid: This is a little more awkward to talk about with regard to GBBRs as it is with AEGs. As I said above, a lot of the things you can do to gas rifles just involve altering the quality of the parts so that they last longer, upping the reliability of the gun. This generally means that you have cheap gas rifles with poor quality parts, and expensive ones with high quality parts. Performance of both will be more or less the same, but the price difference could be anything between £200 for an AGM M4 using very very cheap parts based on the Western Arms system, £300 for a WE using WE's own parts, £400 for a GHK or £600+ for some of the upper end WA based G&P or Inokatsu rifles. What it comes down to is understanding that if you buy cheap, do you have the knowledge and the resources to keep the gun running? Because parts will fail, and you will have to replace them or repair them. If you buy expensive then you have less to worry about because the parts will be made of tougher materials and last much longer. I personally really rate WE, they're on the cheaper end of the spectrum because they don't use very good materials and they have poor quality control... Buuutttt, finding parts and magazines for them is very, very easy, and they don't cost a lot compared to other brands either. So I get my WE M4 for £300 and for £100 I can completely replace every single internal part in one go, or as each part wears out, I can replace it/upgrade it for a stronger material. Who knows? You might get lucky and have the stock parts last you several years, or you might have to replace a load of stuff after your very first skirmish, it's a gamble... But even in the worst case scenario, replacing everything inside the whole gun will still cost you less than buying the next best thing on the market, so I think it's worth the gamble for that. Green vs Propane? As James said, they're the same thing. Green gas is propane with added lubricant. The lubricant is there to keep your seals in check, if they stay moist then they keep working. With propane you have to add the silicone yourself by adding a few drops to the propane canister every 10 or so magazines. I usually drop about 6 drops in at the start of the day and then just leave it until the next game day, never had any issues with any of my mags. Keep a little gas in them for storage and you're golden. The major difference between the two gasses, is price. Propane gets used because it is significantly cheaper. Coleman's propane canisters have somewhere between 2/3 times the amount of gas in them as your standard 750ml green gas can, but they cost the same amount. 1 Coleman's canister lasts me about 1.3 game days and costs me £9 a go. Green gas costs around £10 a bottle, but I'd need at least 3/4 to last the same length of time. How are they in cold weather? Less good than warm weather, to put it simply... Gas expands less the colder it gets, and the act of it expanding cools it down. What this means is that the more you shoot, the colder the parts get, so the colder the gas gets, so the less it expands, so the weaker your shots are. So the more/faster you shoot, the faster/more noticeably cool down will affect your gun. But, if you have a large amount of gas, then the gun can make up for a degree of cool down by simply using more gas per shot. Cool down effects start being noticed when it gets too cold for the amount of gas you have surplus to requirements isn't enough to make up for the loss of efficiency being created by the cold. Let's say your M4 can fire 60 shots - so 2 mags worth of ammo - on one fill of gas when it's 25 degrees C. When it gets to, say, 0 degrees C your shot count will go down because the gas will be colder so it won't expand as much. The second ammo fill you can usually get through on one gas fill now acts as surplus gas, instead of being able to get 60 shots off total, it helps you fire fewer more consistently. So you might get 40 shots off from one fill instead of 60, and they'll still be as effective as they would be in the warmer weather, you just get less of them. Obviously the colder it gets, the fewer shots you get, until it gets too cold to get off a full mag's worth, which is around the point most people give up on gas rifles and rely on AEGs for the colder months. You can get around cool down to an extent by using gasses with a higher pressure, CO2 for example is a much higher pressure gas. Don't quote me but I think the pressure of CO2 at 0 degrees C is comparable to the pressure of Propane at 20C, so CO2 in winter acts like Propane in summer. Obviously it takes a new set of expensive, CO2 compatible mags to take advantage of this work around though, and CO2 mags are generally pretty unreliable because the higher pressure puts more strain on the seals. To some extent you can just fire slower, or less often with your standard gas of choice, as the less you fire, the less you cool the gas down by, but it only goes so far and it depends on the gun... Rifles with smaller lighter bolts, or larger magazines will succumb to cool down slower because it'll take less of the gas they have available to cycle the action. Once you get the gun and use it for a year you'll get accustomed to how it behaves in certain weather and temperatures and you just have to learn to know when to either not go to the game, or take a back up AEG with you. It's just the way it is, unfortunately. Are they louder/more realistic than AEGs? Yes. Definitely louder, if you watch some of my videos then with my L85's bolt being right next to my ear, and thus, my camera, the level of noise it makes on firing quite often maxes out the mic on my camera, so the video will go silent for anything up to a minute in some cases whilst the camera adjusts to the noise level and readjusts. The noise can help you scare people in some cases, but it also scares you in others. There have been times when I could've opened up on a large bunch of guys with an AEG, but my GBBR is so loud that I'd held off to avoid drawing too much undue attention to myself. Their operation is significantly more realistic. They're basically the same as real guns in operation apart from the propellant is stored in the mag instead of a casing, so they don't kick out casings. With AEGs you can just put a mag in and shoot, with GBBRs you have to cock the hammer otherwise it won't shoot, you have to rack the bolt otherwise it won't pick up a round and nothing will come out, the bolt locks on the last shot as per gas pistols. They're basically the same as gas pistols, same level of realism, same amount of weapon control manipulation. But bigger and louder and thus, more awesome. How does the weight compare to reality/AEGs? Pretty much the same as asking how AEG weights compare to the real thing. Airsoft guns in general tend to be fairly close in weight to their real world counter parts. Gas guns tend to go one further and also replicate the balance of the weight. Gearboxes are heavier than trigger sets and bolts combined, but gas rifle mags more than make up for that loss of weight from lighter functioning parts, so they're more or less comparable in weight.
  2. 5 points
    Airsoft-Ed

    The GBBR Thread

    As of the new year, I've now been a gas rifle user for a year, since I bought my WE L85 as a late Christmas present to myself last year. I think I got it on the 4th... So my ikkle baby is a year and 4 days old *wipes away a single tear* Anyway though, I'm going to be filming a review of it over the next few days. I did an unboxing video when I got it, with my first impressions and a firing test, so this is going to be a follow up review, with all my experiences, good and bad, of having it for a year. A helpful approach to reviewing I think, how sick do you all get of seeing people "review" a gun when they've only just opened the box and not even used it in a game? 'Cos it royally pisses me off. Reviews should include hands on experience and be done after enough time for any faults to manifest so they can be mentioned. I'd expect ANY gun to be flawless out of the box, 'cos if it came with issues, of course it's shit... What do these reviewers think they're achieving? I digress... As well as reviewing the gun after a year of living with it, I thought I'd also talk a little more generally about using GBBRs, since a lot of people seem to be put off by them, or look upon them badly for any number of reasons - gas inconsistency, weather dependent performance, poor mag capacity, running costs etc etc. So I was wondering if anyone would appreciate there being a topic to discuss gas rifles for those who are curious about them, considering getting one, or have them and want help getting them up and running after a part failure or something. Maybe we could call it the GBBR thread or something? To start with though, I just wanted to ask if anyone had any questions I could cover in the review? They can be about GBBRs in general, or more specific to the WE L85. Also, we might as well include photos because it makes the thread a bit more appealing if there's an aspect of flashy, showing-offy-ness, right? So let's see what GBBRs our community has, to try and provoke some discussion about them. Here's my L85:
  3. 5 points
    Brilly91

    Gun picture thread

    First gun Dont hate me because im two toned lol
  4. 3 points
    SniperOverwatch

    My Loadout

    Well folks, its nothing to impressive, but here is the first pics of my loadout. I have always liked the way that our old Canadian Forces Olive Drabs BDU's looked. Our military has since converted to the Cadpat, unless you're enlisted in the Navy, then you are issued Navy gear, but our RCAF and Army folks are issued the "Relish Camo" aka Cadpat, which I think looks nice now that its grown on me, but that OD just looked great. Anyway, here is my loadout, with a mix of Old School with New School, a nod to way we once were, mixed with a bit of today. Armed with Russian technology. The vest I'm wearing is made by Parklands, its an LBV-88 and is in the Cadpat pattern. Lots of pockets for my SVD mags, and can fit some First Aid stuff, just in case. I had been planning on using this vest for my sniper outfit, but I think I might just use it for a "Ground Pounder'' outfit, not quite sure yet. Anyway, that is what I have so far. Wanted to pay tribute to our military old and new, the OD is to commemorate our military I grew up in 80s-90s, and Cadpat is a nod to our now military, while the SVD.....well..Its just awesome.
  5. 2 points
    The absolute minimum you have to do to get started, is simply turn up at a skirmish site, put your name and address down and sign a waiver form for their insurance (this is so if you get a tooth shot out or whatever, they aren't to blame). Pay them the fee to play and off you go. Take some ID with you, to prove you are who you say you are, preferably with a photo on it, since some places will ask for it. Typically, new players do that and then hire the gear when at the site for three or four games and then buy their own gear when they are a bit more familiar with what kind of weapon they would like. It will probably cost 10 pounds or so to hire some gear, then the the cost of the skirmish is likely to be about 25 pounds, depending on its length in hours usually, most all day skirmishes cost about 25, evening sessions typically cost about 15. It's obviously not a bad idea to let a skirmish site know you are coming if you want to hire gear, as they might have limited numbers of weapons for hire. In other words, if you are hiring stuff at a skirmish, figure on it costing you about 35 to 40 pounds for a day's skirmishing, and a bit less for an evening session. You might want to check if the skirmish site you go to is UKARA registered (it most likely will be, because almost all airsoft skirmish sites in the UK are). If it is UKARA registered and you wish to join the scheme so you can buy a realistic looking weapon easily in the UK, then you should play three skirmishes at that site, over a period of two months, then fill out a form (which the site will provide), fill that out with your details then send it off to a UKARA registered retailer, who will authorise it (the site will tell you where to send it). Wait a few days, and then you will be contacted with information concerning what your UKARA Registration number is. When you have one of those numbers, you can quote that unique personal number to any shop, they can check it online instantly, and having done that, they will allow you to buy a realistic airsoft weapon. But if you are happy enough to use a weapon which is two toned in colour, and you are over eighteen years of age, then there is absolutely nothing stopping you from buying something like that right now. You can read full explanatory information about the UKARA scheme and how to register on the UKARA database info here: http://www.ukara.org.uk/
  6. 2 points
    TacMaster

    Russian chest rig !!!

    Bit clunky and hefty to wear a PC and rucksack while sniping
  7. 2 points
    SniperOverwatch

    My Loadout

    The beard is in honor of Chris Kyle. Oorah
  8. 2 points
    Osprey is wank though, certainly if I were getting shot at with real bullets the coverage it provides would be welcome but for airsoft it's just not all that good an option. CKinnerley's suggestion for the tactical tailor plate carrier is right on the money, I had no idea they made a basic plate carrier for that little money. Nothing you'll be able to get from China will come close tactical tailor in quality.
  9. 2 points
    Chock

    Gun picture thread

    Not surprised. Norton has got to be one of the biggest scam companies ever. When they're not writing bogus virus alert 'updates' into their software to keep you in panic mode so you renew your subscription to them, they're busy thinking of new ways of tying up your computer's system RAM with that appallingly badly optimised piece of bloated glorified malware.
  10. 2 points
    Chock

    Gun picture thread

    Actually, I think that M4 looks pretty cool in two tone. Most US troops during the Vietnam War probably would have given anything to have been issued an M16 with that colour scheme, because quite a lot of them got hold of green pvc/duct tape and made their M16s look exactly like yours. Although to be fair, a lot of that tape on their M16s was to stop the thing rattling and falling apart, since the first M16s weren't exactly built like tanks, but, you can find a lot of pics of M16s, AR15s, M4 etc looking a lot like yours, so if anyone doesn't like it or think it looks odd or incorrect, then they don't know as much as they think they know! It will certainly work better in a woodland skirmish in that colour scheme than an all black one would. Here's a pic of an M16 with green electrical tape on it during the Vietnam War. Keep in mind that colours are very faded on that old 1960s Kodachrome picture, that tape would actually have been a pretty bright green, not dissimilar to the colour on your M4, because the soldier who stuck that tape on his rifle would have wanted the colour to look like foliage with bright sunlight on it. Also notice that in the same picture, lying on a pack, there appears to be another M16 variant (probably an AR15) in the background which has had a similar treatment with green tape: http://s161.photobucket.com/user/toddmart68/media/walk3.jpg.html A few things about that picture indicate that those guys know what they are doing incidentally. One of the weapons has a suppressor on it, the other appears to be an AR15, both of which were not typically issued to your average 'grunt' in Vietnam, but more often to units such as LRRP or special forces A teams. Note too that the weapon does not have a sling, which was done to avoid having stuff which could rattle or get hung up on branches. Both soldiers are wearing tiger stripe camouflage, as opposed to the standard M65 olive drab army gear you tend to see being worn in that war, also an indication that they are a more 'pro' unit than your average GI. They are in what appears to be a fire support base up in mountainous terrain, evidently high up enough to be in the cloud base, so they are probably near the Central Highlands. In 1968, if that date on the picture is correct, the location and the equipment seen would mean that they are probably involved in covert operations along the Western border of Vietnam.
  11. 2 points
    DEDSEC

    Gun picture thread

    I custom made it by cutting the end off one, and the top of another, welding the two together, stretching the follower spring, sanding the weld, then repainting. Worked amazing well and gave me the ability to A: put more gas in and B: load 39 bb's in.
  12. 1 point
    Hey there everybody. I was always interested in having a go in a proper airsoft skirmish and I went to one or two back in my fatherland (Poland) but I couldn't afford any of the gear then. Now when I can, I happen to live on your beautiful island and rules on ASG aren't really clear to me. What I'm used to is: get whatever gun you want and go shoot your friends with it wherever you want as long as there's no people there and just don't poke anybody's eye out with a bb... I found that it's a bit strict around here... SO! I gathered that I can't buy an actual RIF unless I get something two coloured and go out skirmishing couple of times and then register somewhere... correct? What's the minimum formalities I have to go through to actually get myself started? Do you know of any official skimishing sites in a reasonable driving distance from Worcester? Does any of you live in this area and could invite me along to one of the games? Thanks for all your help, Tom
  13. 1 point
    dex

    Silent heads - worth the money?

    I go with Lonex usually. Take the bearings off for lightness.
  14. 1 point
    Mack

    The GBBR Thread

  15. 1 point
    You could buy a 'two-tone' bright coloured gun and then you need to skirmish three times within a year (but, you can't do all three in under 2 months or something like that) You can also rent at the skirmish so you don't need to buy a gun first. Once you have a UKARA defence you could always order from Europe since AEGs are cheaper, I have ordered from Poland before (from TaiwanGun) and also seen Gunfire.pl We usually ask them to write our UKARA number on the box so customs can see it is okay but they don't always do it.
  16. 1 point
    http://www.tactical-kit.co.uk/tactical-tailor-plate-carrier-modular-22001-7050-p.asp Real deal quality (far and away above most of the chinese made airsoft kit), £25 under budget. If you really need the extra capacity you can add side panels later on down the line.
  17. 1 point
    For less than a hundred quid you'll be hard pressed to find something 'decent', there is serviceable stuff to be had in that price bracket though. I bought one of the carriers chock linked when I first started, my advice is to avoid like the plague. They're beyond garbage, wonky molle, loose stitching, shiny nylon, adjustment holes are just circles burned into the straps. TMC and Flyye do some really quite nicely made stuff for a reasonable budget. I'd look into 6094 style carriers as they're fairly ubiquitous and easy to adjust without complete disassembly. Flyye make a very nice 6094, the TMC 6094 slick with assault panel is also quite nice for the price. EBairsoft are a halfway decent place to go for TMC items, though it'll take a while for them to ship, if you're in a hurry I'd recommend the flyye 6094a.
  18. 1 point
    Chock

    Gun picture thread

    Not really saying it's definitely an AR15 to be honest, that's really just what I tend to call Armalites which have the more later non-tapered grip we typically see on more recent various, since that grip started showing up around the same time that Colt started selling the M16 as a semi-automatic only civilian rifle, which they marketed as the AR15. So it's more a case of 'what i call them' rather than being a correct designation! You're right too, that is woodland he's got on. As far as where I found it, it was just a search on the internet, although I'm pretty sure that it is reproduced in one of the many books I've got on the Vietnam War, because I've definitely seen that pic before.
  19. 1 point
    dex

    Silent heads - worth the money?

    Stick with sorbo and a decent pom piston head.
  20. 1 point
    Mack

    serpa holster

    Think ive heard of people putting the holster in boiling water for a bit then fitting the pistol to remould slightly.
  21. 1 point
    Chock

    Gun picture thread

    They are a little bit more expensive than AEGs because the cost of gassing up a lot of mags, which typically only hold thirty-odd rounds each (for an assault weapon that is), when compared to the cost of a charging your AEG's battery, which might enable you to cheerfully fire off high cap mags all day long, is not equal. Then of course there is certainly a little more time to be spent lubricating and cleaning the working parts of a GBB if one hopes to keep it working smoothly, as opposed to an AEG, which could literally go for weeks without so much as a wipe with a damp cloth. But that is not necessarily a bad thing, or even a chore, if you happen to like guns and looking after them as much as you like using them. The main cost is probably acquiring a GBB, and sufficient magazines for it. The magazines for a GBB are typically 25-50 quid each, and you need five or six of them to emulate a typical soldier's patrol loadout, so for a typical assault rifle, you might be spending another 200-300 quid just for magazines if it is a GBB. Conversely, AEG mags are more typically about 10 quid and you can get away with just one high cap one actually, and as you know, most AEGs come with one of those anyway. Even if you go with carrying six low cap AEG mags for a bit more reloading realism, you can invariably find boxes of five or six AEG mags can be had for about thirty quid or so. Offsetting all of that additional GBB cost is the enhanced realism of a GBB of course. Unlike with an AEG, the firepower of a GBB is held in the magazines, as it is in a real firearm, so changing mags is a more realistic experience; the weapon is inert without a mag, unlike an AEG, so the emulation of a real firearm is vastly closer when using a GBB, even to the extent of field stripping the bolt and gas return mechanisms, which are often an almost identical procedure to the real weapon when field stripping a GBB version of it. The clatter of the action is more visceral than the whirring of an AEG and more akin to the sound you hear when firing the real weapon, the gas tends to give off a bit of visible vapour too, which looks more like a real firearm as well. Given that all these things add to the experience we are trying to emulate with airsoft, both when using and maintaining the weapon, you could argue that all of that offsets the additional cost, by adding to the value of the experience of owning and using a GBB. Trouble is of course, that they are notoriously crappy in these present low ambient temperatures lol. But come summer, they are certainly the thing to have if you want something which will add to the fun of things, and i would say that their ability to add fun to the proceedings makes the cost worth the price of entry. Thus at the moment, my GBBs - MP5K, AKS74U, Colt 1911, Walther PPK - are all hibernating, but come summer, they'll certainly be getting an outing, and I'll be too busy having fun with them to worry about each shot maybe costing one pence more.
  22. 1 point
    Chock

    Painting Airsoft Guns

    Yes it would be an IF and no longer a RIF if you painted it that way, but you should be aware that - assuming you are going to use it for airsofting, or historical re-enactments, or in a movie or a play you are producing, etc - then it absolutely is not illegal to own a RIF, even if it looks like the most unbelievably realistic gun ever, providing you can demonstrably prove you have an entirely peaceful reason for wanting to possess such a thing. It only becomes illegal if you to do something stupid and antisocial with one, such as holding up a bank with it, or scaring people in the streets with it, etc. That is the reason why the legislation about the things is called the Violent Crimes Reduction Act and not the Stop You Making Movies or Plays, Going Airsofting & suchlike Act. But of course it is also illegal to hold up a bank whilst holding a wooden spoon in your coat pocket and claiming it is a gun; it merely becomes easier to hold up a bank with a RIF at your disposal, which is why so much of the sections in the VCR Act are concerned with the supply of RIFs as opposed to the possession of them, because supplying a RIF to someone who is going to do something stupid and illegal with it, is effectively going to make you complicit in the crime. So in essence it's fairly simple: if you have either an IF, or a RIF, then just don't be a dick with it, don't flash it about in public and don't scare anyone with it, use it only for a legitimate purpose and don't lend it to, or sell it to anyone who does not have a legitimate reason to own it (and who can prove that to you satisfactorily). Adhere to that behaviour and you will not have any problems. Above all, always bear in mind that as much as we like the things, not everyone is into guns, nor able to easily identify a real one, so you can entirely understand someone being scared if they think someone is wandering about with one because they see you putting your realistic-looking but plastic AK74 into the boot of your car, so just don't ever create that possibility and the law will not ever be your concern. You have a legal responsibility to ensure that is the case, which is what all that VCR Act stuff is really about.
  23. 1 point
    RabidNinja64

    Gun picture thread

    My first ever airsoft gun; and a GBB one at that
  24. 1 point
    Ian_Gere

    objectives and props in scenarios

    Skirmish CQB and Skirmish The Stan allow 350 +5% = 368FPS, but no full auto indoors. I think it's fine, but then again I always wear a mesh 1/2 face mask... It makes sense for their customers who have their guns set up for the woodland site to be able to use them without modification at their other sites.
  25. 1 point
    Ian_Gere

    On Site Briefs.

    ^^The way to stop that is to make the regen far enough away that it takes a fair while to get back. I think briefings could be paired down and be at least as effective, if not more so, if the marshals were more serious about it - there's no need for any light heartedness or humour - it's for safety and the rules which allow the games to be fun: if people can't be serious for 5 mins listening to it, they should fuck off. IMO marshals should shush people who talk during briefings... with extreme prejudice. But many people do have a short attention span. Keeping anything specific to a particular game or zone out of the main safety/rules brief and only bringing it up before a game where it will become relevant is probably the best way to go - you'd probably have to repeat it anyway just to be sure that everyone had either remembered or actually listened. Something I've only seen sporadically, but which could be a good idea to do systematically, is for marshals to mention in the mini brief just before a game starts common instances of rule breaking/bending, poor sportsmanship, or whatever bad behaviour which have occurred there before. For eg "This is a rolling defence game. There are limited opportunities to take effective cover and it is supposed to be like that - we want you to shoot and move - avoid being hit by displacing. We've had defenders using dead men as cover before. Don't do that. It just makes the game needlessly difficult for the attackers and, when we turn it around, you wouldn't like it if they did it to you."
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?

    Sign Up
×