lil airsofter

what they use

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thanks hubert, i'm going to try and find that M3 :D

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no, it was prototyped but never put into service.

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Errr...sort of.

Production of Service Rifle Number 9, Automatic starts around 1948.

 

It isn't until 1953-54 that Britain is forced by the US via NATO to take the 7.62 and find it has to drop the EM-2 (which would be very difficult to modify to 7.62) - so there's roughly 3-4 years of it being around and issued to some units. It was never given out en-masse as it was taking Enfield and the various arms factories time to re-engineer tools to build it.

Did it see combat service? Let's put it this way, there was plenty of opportunity in those 4 years for at least 1 element of the British Armed forces to use it (outside of field testing). A book I've read about Korea makes passing mention to "glory seeking b*****s, looking like big toy soldiers and carrying a new back-to-front Enfield rifle that looks like it was mangled". I assume from that it was very limited trials in Korea.

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Answered my question

The EM-2, Also known as Rifle No.9 Mk1 or "Janson rifle", was an experimental British assault rifle. It was briefly adopted by British forces in 1951, but the decision was overturned very shortly thereafter by Winston Churchill's incoming government in an effort to secure NATO standardisation of small arms and ammunition in the face of American intransigence.

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austrian army:Glock 17 (Pistole 80) sidearm

FN FAL (StG 58) service rifle, only used by Austrian Guard Company

Steyr AUG (StG 77) service rifle

Steyr SSG 69 sniper rifle

MG 74 machine gun

FN MAG machine gun (only used on Leopard 2A4 tanks, ULAN tanks and Black Hawk helicopters)

Browning M2 (üsMG M2) heavy machine gun

BILL 1 Anti-tank guided weapon (PAL 2000 "Bill")

Carl Gustav recoilless rifle (PAR 66/79)

L16 81mm Mortar (mGrW 82)

Hirtenberger M12-1111 120mm heavy mortar (GrW 86)

Only used by Special Forces:

 

Steyr TMP submachine gun

FN P90 submachine gun

Remington 870 shotgun

Steyr HS .50 anti-materiel rifle

Barrett M95 anti-materiel rifle

Name Type Caliber Origin Notes

Jericho 941[2] Semi-Automatic Pistol 9x19mm Israel

Glock 17[3] Semi-Automatic Pistol 9x19mm Austria

Glock 19[4] Semi-Automatic Pistol 9x19mm Austria

Browning Hi-Power[4] Semi-Automatic Pistol 9x19mm Belgium

Beretta M951[2] Semi-Automatic Pistol 9x19mm Italy

Heckler & Koch P11[2] Underwater pistol 7.62x36mm Germany

IMI Uzi[5] Submachine Gun 9x19mm Israel Uzi, Mini-Uzi and Micro-Uzi used.

Ingram Mac-10[2] Submachine Gun 9x19mm United States

IMI Micro Tavor MTAR-21[2] Submachine Gun and Bullpup Assault Rifle 9x19mm / 5.56x45mm Israel Variant of the Tavor Assault Rifle, replacing the Uzi, and becoming the standard issue assault rifle

IMI Tavor TAR-21[2] Assault Rifle 5.56x45mm Israel Variants used are TAR-21, GTAR-21, STAR-21 and CTAR-21

M4 Carbine[2] Assault Rifle 5.56x45mm United States

M16A1[6] Assault Rifle 5.56x45mm United States

CAR-15[4] Assault Rifle 5.56x45mm United States

IMI Galil[2][5] Assault Rifle 5.56x45mm Israel Variants used are Galil AR and Galil SAR

IMI Micro Galil Assault Rifle 5.56x45mm Israel Highly compact version of the Galil

AKM[2][5][7] Assault Rifle 7.62x39mm Soviet Union Used By Special Forces

AK-47[2][5][8] Assault Rifle 7.62x39mm Soviet Union Used By Special Forces

M14[2] Battle Rifle 7.62x51mm United States

IMI Negev[2] Light Machine Gun 5.56x45mm Israel

M1919 Browning Light Machine Gun .30-06 Springfield United States of America

FN MAG[9] General Purpose Machine Gun 7.62x51mm Belgium

PKM[4] General Purpose Machine Gun 7.62x54mmR Soviet Union Used by Special Forces

Browning M2[2] Heavy Machine Gun 12.7x99mm United States

Remington 870[4] Shotgun 12 Gauge United States

Mossberg 500 Shotgun 12 Gauge United States

SR-25[4] Sniper Rifle 7.62x51mm United States

IMI Galatz Sniper Rifle 7.62x51mm Israel Sniper variant of the Galil

M24[4] Sniper Rifle 7.62x51mm United States

HTR 2000 Sniper Rifle .338 Lapua United States

M89SR[4] Sniper Rifle 7.62x51mm Israel

Barrett M82 Anti Materiel Rifle 12.7x99mm United States

M26A2 Fragmentation Grenade n/a Israel Based on the American M26 grenade

IDF M48 Stun grenade n/a Israel Based on the American M84 stun grenade

Suppressed Ruger 10/22[4][10] Semiautomatic rifle .22LR United States Adopted for non-lethal crowd control, though not always used as such

Armsel Striker Revolving Shotgun 12 Gauge South Africa Used for riot control

 

[edit] Rocket and grenade launchersName Type Caliber Origin

RPG-7 Shoulder-launched Rocket 85mm Soviet Union

B-300 Shoulder-launched Rocket 82mm Israel

Shipon Shoulder-launched Rocket 83mm Israel

M72 LAW Shoulder-launched Rocket 66mm United States

MATADOR Shoulder-launched Rocket 90mm Israel/ Singapore

M79[2] Stand-alone Grenade Launcher 40mm United States

M203[2] Under-Barrel Grenade Launcher 40mm United States

Mk 19[2] Automatic Grenade Launcher 40mm United States

Mk 47 Striker Automatic Grenade Launcher 40mm United States

 

idf(israel):

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thanks hubert, i'm going to try and find that M3 :D

 

It was really funny, loads of classical american gun enthusiasts crying out things like "whyyyy did they do that?! There's nothing wrong with the M3!" and "it looks awful, how could they do that?!" and "that's worthless now, they've devalued it!"

 

Response from member of military:

"We can't afford the expensive plastic toys the Americans make like the M16. We make do with what we have - that works - and that is what matters. Aesthetics mean nothing in combat"

 

EM-2 - saw trials and tests from 1949-1952 according to encyclopedia of modern firearms, offically dropped in 1952.

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switzerland army:Individual weaponsSturmgewehr 90 assault rifle (171,283)

Sturmgewehr 57 battle rifle (2,392)

Pistole 75 semi-automatic pistol (27,831)

Pistole 49 semi-automatic pistol (1,360)

Heckler & Koch MP5 submachinegun

Brügger & Thomet MP9 machine pistol

Tuma MTE 224 VA machine pistol

Remington 870 multipurpose shotgun (known as Mehrzweckgewehr 91)

Sako TRG-42 8.6 mm anti-personnel sniper rifle (Scharfschützengewehr 04)

PGM Hecate II 12.7 mm anti-materiel heavy sniper rifle (Gew06)

[edit] Crew served weaponsMG51 machine gun

FN Minimi light machine gun

MG 710 machine gun / MG55 (still stocked, but neither trained on nor used in rep courses; same as MG3)

[edit] Other weaponsGewehraufsatz 97 40mm grenade launcher (mounted under "Sturmgewehr 90" assault rifle for grenadiers)

HG 85 hand grenade

Panzerfaust 3 shoulder-launched recoilless anti-tank weapon

M47 Dragon anti-tank guided rocket (being phased out without replacement due to cost-intensive maintenance)

 

united states army(its a big one)In active serviceM9 (Beretta 92FS, 9x19mm)

M11 (SIG P228, 9x19mm)

[edit] In active service (some branches or limited roles)Mk 24 Mod 0 (SIG P226 Navy, 9x19mm) (Naval Special Warfare)

M9A1 (9x19mm) (USMC)

MEU(SOC) pistol (.45 ACP) (MEU(SOC))

Mk 23 Mod 0 (.45 ACP) (USSOCOM)

SIG P229R DAK (.40 S&W) (USCG)

M1911A1 (.45 ACP) (Army)

Heckler & Koch HK45 (.45 ACP) (Naval Special Warfare)

Glock 19 (9x19mm) (USSOCOM)

[edit] Out of service (obsolete)/Canceled experiments)AAI QSPR (Quiet Special Purpose Revolver, .44 Magnum) (never issued)

Beretta 92SB (9x19mm) (JSSAP winner)

Browning Hi-Power (9x19mm) (Special Forces)

Colt Dragoon Revolver (1st/2nd/3rd) (.44)

Colt M1900 (.38 ACP) (never issued)

Colt M1902 (.38 ACP) (never issued)

Colt M1903 (.32 ACP) (General Officers)

Colt M1905 (.45 ACP) (never issued)

Colt M1908 (.380 ACP) (General Officers)

Colt OHWS (.45 ACP) (never issued)

Colt SCAMP (.22 SCAMP) (never issued)

Joint Combat Pistol and related (.45 ACP) (suspended indefinitely)

Gyrojet handgun (13mm) (never issued)

Harpers Ferry Model 1805 (.54)

High Standard HDM (.22 LR) (Navy SEALs and USMC Force Recon)

Misc. JSSAP/XM9/XM10 entrants (9x19mm) (never issued)

Kimber ICQB (.45 ACP) (MEU(SOC))

LeMat Revolver (.41/.63, .35/.5)

M15 General Officers (.45 ACP)

M1799 flintlock pistol (.69)

M1816 flintlock pistol (.54)

M1836 flintlock pistol (.54)

M1842 Navy (.54)

M1842 Pistol (.54)

M1847 Pistol (.44)

M1849 Pocket Pistol (.31)

M1851 Navy (.36)

M1860 Army Revolver (.44)

M1861 Navy Revolver (.36)

M1873 (.45 Colt)

M1889 Navy (.38 Long Colt)

M1892/M1894 Army (.38 Long Colt)

M1896 Revolver (.38 Long Colt)

M1902 Revolver (.38 Long Colt)

M1900 (DWM "American Eagle Luger"; 7.65x22mm, 9x19mm, .45 ACP) (never issued)

M1903 Army (.38 Special/.38 Long Colt)

M1905 Marine (.38 Long Colt)

M1908 Army (.38 Special)

M1909 Army (.45 Colt)

M1917 (.45 ACP)

Mk 1 Underwater Defense Gun (Mk 59 Mod 0) (Navy SEALs)

Mk 22 Mod 0 (9x19mm Parabellum) (Special Forces)

Objective Personal Defense Weapon (canceled)

Remington-Beals Revolver (.36)

Remington M1858 (.44)

Remington M53 (.45 ACP) (never issued)

Remington M1865/M1867 Navy (.50)

Ruger MK II (.22 LR) (Navy SEALs)

Savage Arms .45 pistol (.45 ACP) (never issued)

Savage Figure Eight (.36)

Schofield Model 3 (.45 Schofield)

Smith & Wesson Model 12 (.38 Special)

Smith & Wesson Model 15 (.38 Special) (USAF)

Smith & Wesson No. 2 (.32)

Spiller and Burr (.36)

Star Model 1863 (.44)

Steyr Mannlicher M1894 (7.65x21mm) (never issued)

[edit] Non-lethal[edit] In active service (some branches or limited roles)FN 303

M37 Mid-size Riot Control Disperser[11][12]

[edit] Out of service (obsolete)M234 Riot Control Launcher

[edit] RiflesIncludes muskets, musketoons, etc., as well as rifles

 

 

Rifles of the Vietnam era[edit] In active serviceM16A4 Assault rifle, (5.56x45mm NATO)

[edit] In active service (some branches or limited roles)Mk 17 Mod 0 (Selective Fire rifle, 7.62x51mm NATO) (US SOCOM)

Mk 12 Special Purpose Rifle,

M14 (Selective Fire rifle, 7.62x51mm NATO)

M14 SMUD (Stand-off Munition Disruption rifle, 7.62x51mm NATO)

M16A2 (5.56x45mm NATO)

M16A3 (5.56x45mm NATO) (Navy Seabees)

Mk 16 Mod 0 (Assault rifle, 5.56x45mm NATO) (Non-standard, in use by select US SOCOM units)

[edit] Out of service (obsolete)/Canceled experimentsXM8 (Lightweight Assault Rifle system, 5.56x45mm NATO) (never issued)

XM29 (Kinetic Energy and Airburst Launcher System; 5.56x45mm NATO and 20 mm airburst munition (XM1018)(early)/25 mm airburst munition) (experiment canceled)

Misc. Advanced Combat Rifle entries (concluded 1991)

Misc. Future Rifle Program entries (canceled)

Misc. Special Purpose Individual Weapon (SPIW) entries (concluded/canceled)

FN FAL (battle rifle, trialled as T48 against the T44 and T47 to replace the M1: lost to the former)

M14E1 (Selective Fire Rifle, 7.62x51mm NATO) (never standardized)

M16A1 (5.56x45mm NATO)

AR-15/Colt Model 601/602 (5.56x45mm NATO rifle) (USAF and SOF use only)

XM22/E1 Rifle (Selective Fire Rifle, 5.56x45mm NATO)

Mk 4 Mod 0 (Suppressed Rifle, 5.56x45mm NATO)

Misc. M1 Garand Variants (E1-E6 and E9-E14) (Semi-Automatic Rifle, .30-'06) (never used in active duty)

Mk 2 Mod 0/1/2 (Semi-Automatic Rifle, 7.62x51mm NATO)

M1 Garand (Semi-automatic rifle, .30-06)

M1941 Johnson rifle (Semi-Automatic Rifle, .30-'06)

Gyrojet rifle (13 mm) (never issued)

Pedersen Rifle (.276) (competed unsuccessfully with M1 Garand to become primary service rifle)

Pedersen Device (attachment for Springfield M1903, .30 conversion)

M1918 BAR (.30-06)

M1903/A1/A3 (Bolt-action rifle; .30-03, .30-06)

M1917 Enfield (Bolt-action rifle)

Model 1907/15 Berthier rifle (Bolt action rifle)[13]

M1916 Mosin Nagant (Bolt-action rifle)[14]

M1895 Navy (Navy Lee, 6 mm Navy)

M1892/M1896/M1898 Rifle (a/k/a Krag Bolt Action Rifle; .30-40 Krag)

M1892/M1896/M1898/M1899 Carbine (a/k/a Krag Bolt Action Carbine; .30-40 Krag)

M1885 Remington-Lee (Bolt-action rifle; .45-70 Gov)

M1882 Short Rifle (.45-70 Gov.)

M1882 Remington-Lee (Bolt-action rifle; .45-70 Gov.)

M1879 Remington-Lee (Bolt-action rifle; .45-70 Gov.)

Remington-Keene rifle (Bolt-action rifle; .45-70 Gov.)[15]

M1877/M1879/M1884/M1886 Carbine (.45-70 Gov.: .45-55-405 & .45-70-500)

M1875 Officers' Rifle (.45-70 Gov.)

M1873/M1879/M1880/M1884/M1888/M1889 Springfield (a/k/a Trapdoor Springfield;.45-70 Gov..: .45-55-405 & .45-70-500)

M1872 Springfield (a/k/a Rolling Block Springfield; .50-70 Gov.)

M1865/M1866/M1868/M1869/M1870 Springfield (a/k/a Trapdoor Springfield; .50-70 Government)

Sharps carbine/rifle (Breech-loader; .42-60-410) (.52 caliber issued to Berdan's 1st and 2nd US Sharpshooters in the US Civil War)

Henry rifle (Lever-action; .44-26-200)

Spencer rifle (Lever-action; 56-56 (.52-45-350))

M1863 Springfield

M1861 Springfield (.58)

Colt revolving rifle (Colt Model 1855; 6/5-shot revolver rifle;.44/.56)

Greene rifle (Bolt-action breech-loader)

P53 Enfield (.577 (.58))

P51 Enfield Musketoon ("Artillery Carbine"; 24" barrel, .69)

Model 1854 Lorenz rifle (Rifle-musket, .54, .58)

M1859 Sharps ('New model 1859', breech loader; .52, .56)

M1855 Rifle-Musket

M1855 Rifle (Percussion muzzle-loader; 58-60-500)

M1847 Musketoon (Springfield, .69)

M1842 Musket (Percussion musket, .69)

M1841 Rifle "Mississippi Rifle" (percussion muzzle-loader;.54 , .58)

M1840 Musket (flintlock musket;.69)(later percussion)

M1835 Springfield (flintlock musket; .67 cal)

M1819 Hall rifle (Harper's Ferry;Breech-loader)

Model 1822 Musket (Flintlock Musket) .69 (later percussion)

Model 1816 Musket (Flintlock musket; .69) (Later Percussion)

Model 1817 Rifle ('Common rifle';Derringer, Johnson, North and Starr; Flintlock rifle, .54) (later percussion)

Model 1814 Rifle (Deringer; Flintlock rifle)

Springfield Model 1812 Musket (Flintlock musket; .69)

Model 1808 Contract Musket (Flintlock musket; .69)

Harper's Ferry Model 1803 Rifle (Flintlock rifle; .54)

Model 1795 Musket (Flintlock musket; .69)

Charleville musket (Flintlock musket; .69)

Brown Bess (Musket; .75)

Kentucky Rifle (Flintlock rifle)

Ferguson rifle (Flintlock breech-loader; .69)

[edit] Carbines[edit] In active serviceM4 carbine (5.56x45mm NATO)

M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle (5.56x45mm NATO) (USMC)

[edit] In active service (some branches or limited roles)Colt Model 723/725/727 (M16A2 carbine, 5.56x45mm NATO) (US Navy)

GUU-5/P (Automatic carbine, 5.56x45mm NATO) (USAF)

Mk 17 Mod 0 (Selective Fire rifle, 7.62x51mm NATO) (United States SOCOM)

HK416 (Automatic carbine, 5.56x45mm NATO) (JSOC units)

M231 FPW (Firing Port Weapon, 5.56x45mm NATO) (US Army)

M4A1 carbine (5.56x45mm NATO) (USSOCOM, USARMY and select USMC units)

Mk 18 Mod 0 CQBR (CQB assault rifle, 5.56x45mm NATO) (Navy and Coast Guard)

[edit] Out of service (obsolete) including canceled experimentsMk 16 Mod 0 (Assault rifle, 5.56x45mm NATO) (canceled program[16])

XM8 Compact Carbine (5.56x45mm) (never issued)

M4E2 Carbine (Automatic Carbine, 5.56x45mm NATO) (never standardized)

CAR-15 Survival Rifle (5.56x45mm)

Colt Model 653 (M16A1 Carbine, 5.56x45mm NATO)

GAU-5/A and A/A ("SMG," 5.56x45mm)

XM177/E1/E2 ("SMG," 5.56x45mm)

Colt Model 733 (5.56x45mm NATO) (USMC Force Recon)

XM23 Carbine (Selective Fire Carbine, 5.56x45mm NATO)

GUU-4/P ("Arm Gun," .221 Remington Fireball)

CAR-15 SMG (CAR-15 w/ 10" barrel, 5.56 mm)

CAR-15 Carbine (M16 w/ 15" barrel, 5.56x45mm)

AR-7 (.22 LR)

M1/M1A1 Carbine (Semi-Automatic Carbine, .30 Carbine)

M2 Carbine (Full-Automatic Carbine, .30 Carbine)

M3 Carbine (Scoped Full-Automatic Carbine, .30 Carbine)

M50 Reising

T38/M4 (Survival Rifle; .22 Hornet)

T39/M6 (Survival Rifle; .22 Hornet/.410 Gauge)

MA-1 (AR-5 Survival Rifle; .22 Hornet)

Smith carbine (Breech-loader (break-open); .50-50-360)

Burnside carbine (Breech-loader, .58-60-500)

Starr Carbine (Breech-loader, .54)

Springfield Model 1863 (Breech-barrel carbine, .52-cal.)

[edit] Shotguns[edit] In active serviceM500 (Pump-action 12 Gauge)

M590 (Pump-action 12 Gauge)

M590A1 (Pump-action 12 Gauge)

[edit] In active service (Some Branches or limited roles)M870 (Pump-action 12 gauge)

M1014 (Semi-automatic 12 Gauge) (Marines and Army)

M26 Modular Accessory Shotgun System (Bolt-action 12 gauge attachment) (Army)

[edit] Out of ServiceIthaca M37 (Pump-action 12 gauge)

Remington 7188 (Full-auto 12 gauge) (Navy SEALs)

Remington Model 10 (Pump-action 12 gauge)

Remington Model 11 (Semi-automatic 12 gauge)

Remington Model 31 (Pump-action 12 gauge)

Springfield Model 1881 Forager (20 gauge)

Stevens Model 520-30 (Pump-action 12 gauge)

Stevens Model 620 (Pump-action 12 gauge)

Winchester 1200 (Pump-action 12 gauge)

Winchester Model 1912 (Pump-action 12 gauge)

Winchester Model 1897 (Pump-Action 12 Gauge)

CAWS entrants, specifically HK CAWS

[edit] ExperimentalAA-12 (Semi-automatic/Full-automatic 12 gauge) (Special forces, primarily Navy SEALS)

[edit] Submachine guns[edit] In active service (some branches or limited roles)MP5N (9x19mm Parabellum), special operations only, not standardized

[edit] Out of service (obsolete)M3/M3A1 Grease Gun (.45 ACP/9x19mm Parabellum)

Madsen M50 (9x19mm Parabellum)

Walther MPL/MPK (9x19mm Parabellum)

HK SMG II (9x19mm Parabellum) (never issued)

HK 54A1 (9x19mm Parabellum) (never issued)

HK MP2000 (9x19mm Parabellum) (never issued)

Mk 24 Mod 0 (Smith & Wesson Model 76; 9x19mm Parabellum)

Carl Gustaf M/45 (9x19mm Parabellum)

Model 50/55 Reising (.45 ACP)

M2 submachine gun (Hyde-Inland M2, .45 ACP)

MAC-10 (.45 ACP / 9x19mm Parabellum)

M42 submachine gun (United Defense M42, .45 ACP/9x19mm Parabellum)

M1/M1A1 Thompson (.45 ACP)

M1928/M1928A1 Thompson (.45 ACP)

M1921 Thompson (.45 ACP) (not type classified)

Uzi/Mini Uzi (9x19mm Parabellum)[17]

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It was really funny, loads of classical american gun enthusiasts crying out things like "whyyyy did they do that?! There's nothing wrong with the M3!" and "it looks awful, how could they do that?!" and "that's worthless now, they've devalued it!"

 

Response from member of military:

"We can't afford the expensive plastic toys the Americans make like the M16. We make do with what we have - that works - and that is what matters. Aesthetics mean nothing in combat"

 

EM-2 - saw trials and tests from 1949-1952 according to encyclopedia of modern firearms, offically dropped in 1952.

 

haha I bet they would!

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i think my list is too big.

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just a little, i dont think my screen will show words any longer than Uzi

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can anyone find anything solid on the russian army cayse i am struggling.

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russian army:Small armsName Type Cartridge Origin Notes

Makarov PMM Semi-automatic pistol 9x18 PMM Soviet Union 8 round magazine, main service sidearm 1951-1991. Still in Service.

Serdyukov SPS Semi-automatic pistol 9x21 SP-10/11 Soviet Union 18 round magazine, high armor piercing capability. Originally known as the Gyurza, and also known as the SR-1 Vektor in FSB service.

MP-443 Grach Semi-automatic pistol 9x19 7N21 Russia 17 round magazine, special high power cartridge, designed to replace most PMMs as main service sidearm. Known as the Yarygin PYa in military service. Limited service with special forces.

6P9 PB Silenced Semi-automatic pistol 9x18 PM Soviet Union 8 round magazine

PSS Silenced semi-automatic pistol 7.62x41 SP-4 Soviet Union 6 round magazine, fires a "special purpose noiseless cartridge"

Stechkin APS Machine pistol 9x18 PM Soviet Union 20 round magazine

6P13 APB Silenced machine pistol 9x18 PM Soviet Union 20 round magazine

PP-19 Bizon Submachine gun 9x18 PMM or 9x19 Russia 64 round helical magazine

AEK-919K "Kashtan" Submachine gun 9x18 PMM Russia 20 or 30 round magazine capacity. Issued to special forces.

Saiga-12 Shotgun 12 gauge Russia Combat shotgun fed from 8 round magazine

AK-74M Assault rifle 5.45x39 Soviet Union 30 round magazine, new 60 round magazine, main service rifle of the Russian armed forces

AK-74 Assault rifle 5.45x39 Soviet Union 30 round magazine, In service with Soviet Naval Infantry and reserve troops, Supplemented by AK-74M.

AKS-74 Assault rifle 5.45x39 Soviet Union 30 round magazine, new 60 round magazine, moderate usage by VDV

AKS-74U Assault rifle 5.45x39 Soviet Union 30 round magazine, shortened version of the AK-74, moderate usage

AKM Assault rifle 7.62x39 Soviet Union 30 round magazine, former main service rifle, some usage mainly in urban environments due to the ability to penetrate heavy cover.

AN-94 Assault rifle 5.45x39 Russia 30 round magazine, new 60 round magazine, 2 round burst mode fired at 1800 RPM, originally designed to replace AK-74M, limited usage

AK-105 Assault rifle 5.45x39 Russia 30 round Magazine, Replacing AKS-74U[citation needed]

AS Val Silenced assault rifle 9x39 SP-5 or SP-6 Soviet Union 10 or 20 round magazine, uses an integrated suppressor.

Dragunov SVD Sniper rifle 7.62x54 Soviet Union 10 round magazine, semi auto, main service sniper rifle.

Dragunov SVU Sniper rifle 7.62x54 Russia 10 round magazine, semi auto, bullpup variant of the SVD, moderate usage

VSS Vintorez Suppressed sniper rifle 9x39 SP-5 or SP-6 Soviet Union 10 or 20 round magazine, semi or full auto, uses an integrated suppressor.

SV-98 Sniper rifle 7.62x54 Russia 10 round magazine, bolt action, limited usage

KSVK Anti-material rifle 12.7x108 Russia 5 round magazine, semi auto, limited usage

OSV-96 Anti-material rifle 12.7x108 Russia 5 round magazine, semi auto, can be folded in half, limited usage

RPK-74 Light machine gun 5.45x39 Soviet Union 30 or 45 round magazine, based on the AK-74, main service SAW

RPK Light machine gun 7.62x39mm Soviet Union 30 or 40 round magazine or 75 round drum, former main service LMG, based on the AKM, some usage

PKM General purpose machine gun 7.62x54 Soviet Union Belt fed with 100 or 200 or 250 round boxes, uses a heavily modified Kalashnikov design, main service general purpose machine gun

PKP "Pecheneg" General purpose machine gun 7.62x54 Russia Belt fed with 100 or 200 round boxes. Based on and designed to replace the PKM, limited usage

NSV Heavy machine gun 12.7x108 Soviet Union Belt fed with 50 round boxes, main service heavy machine gun.

Kord Heavy machine gun 12.7x108 Russia Belt fed with 50 round boxes, replacing the NSV as the main service heavy machine gun. Limited usage.

 

[edit] Grenades and grenade launchersName Type Diameter Origin Notes

RGO Hand grenade Soviet Union 6 meter kill radius, 3.8 second fuse, will detonate on impact after being armed for 1.8 seconds

RGN Hand grenade Soviet Union 4 meter kill radius, 3.8 second fuse, will detonate on impact after being armed for 1.8 seconds

GP-30 Under-barrel grenade launcher 40mm Soviet Union can be fitted to AKM, AK-74, AN-94, and AK-10X rifles and their variants

RG-6/6G-30 Multi-shot grenade launcher 40mm Russia 6 round capacity in revolver style cylinders

GM-94 Multi-shot grenade launcher 43mm Russia 3 round tube magazine, pump action, optimized for close quarters battle using grenades with a small kill radius

AGS-17 Automatic grenade launcher 30mm Soviet Union Belt fed with 29 round drums, high rate of fire

AGS-30 Automatic grenade launcher 30mm Russia Belt fed with 29 round drums, lightweight modern version of the AGS-17.

 

[edit] MinesName Type Detonation Origin Notes

MON-90 Anti-personnel mine Tripwire/Command Propels ~2000 steel projectiles to a kill radius of 90 meters

MON-100 Anti-personnel mine Tripwire/Command Propels ~400 steel projectiles to a kill radius of 100 meters.

MON-200 Anti-personnel mine Tripwire/Command A larger and more powerful version of the MON-100

OZM-72 Anti-personnel mine Tripwire/Command/Pressure ~500g TNT, fragmentation mine.

POMZ Anti-personnel mine Tripwire/Command/Pressure ~75g TNT, fragmentation mine

PMN Anti-personnel mine Pressure ~240g TNT, anti-personnel blast mine

PMN-2 Anti-personnel mine Pressure ~100g TNT, anti-personnel blast mine

PMN-4 Anti-personnel mine Pressure ~50g TNT, anti-personnel blast mine

TM-57 Anti-tank mine Pressure 6.3 kg TNT

TM-62M Anti-tank mine Pressure 7.5 kg TNT

TM-83 Anti-tank mine Seismic sensors ~13 kg TNT

TM-89 Anti-tank mine Seismic sensors ~10 kg TNT

 

[edit] Rocket and missile systemsName Type Diameter Origin Notes

RPO-A Shmel Shoulder-launched missile weapon 93mm Soviet Union Single-shot, disposable rocket launcher. Uses RPO-A thermobaric and RPO-Z incendiary rockets.

RPG-7V2 Rocket-propelled grenade Varies Soviet Union Re-loadable launcher with a variety of anti-personnel and anti-tank munitions available.

RPG-16 Rocket-propelled grenade 58mm Soviet Union Re-loadable launcher, Higher accuracy and four times the range of the RPG-7

RPG-22 Rocket-propelled gernade 72.5mm Soviet Union One shot disposable launcher.

RPG-26 Rocket-propelled grenade 72.5mm Soviet Union Single-shot disposable launcher.

RPG-27 Rocket-propelled grenade 105mm Soviet Union Single-shot disposable launcher with tandem-charge warhead in an anti-tank role, and RShG-1 thermobaric warhead for anti-infantry use.

RPG-29 Rocket-propelled grenade 105mm Soviet Union Re-loadable launcher. Can use PG-29V tandem-charge munitions in an anti-tank role, or TBG-29 thermobaric munitions in anti-infantry use.

RPG-32 Rocket-propelled grenade 105mm Russia Re-loadable launcher. Can use PG-32V tandem-charge munitions in an anti-tank role, or TBG-32V thermobaric munitions in anti-infantry use.

9M111M Fagot-M Anti-tank guided missile 120mm Soviet Union Designated AT-4C "Spigot C" by NATO.

9M113M Konkurs-M Anti-tank guided missile 135mm Soviet Union Designated AT-5B "Spandrel B" by NATO.

9K115-2 Metis-M Anti-tank guided missile 130mm Russia Designated AT-13 "Saxhorn-2" by NATO.

9M133 Kornet Anti-tank guided missile 152mm Russia Designated AT-14 "Spriggan" by NATO.

9K34 Strela-3 Man-portable air-defense system Soviet Union Designated SA-14 "Gremlin" by NATO.

9K38 Igla-1S Man-portable air-defense system 72mm Soviet Union Designated SA-18 "Grouse" by NATO.

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Another adition on the russian forces, in high security prisons, they use AK47's or AK74's (Documentaries are great).

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ok i am going to do a revival and a shake up as this was a lot of help to some as well as by country lets turn it round so those who just want a new uniform with their new gun, please double check what i put as their is only as good as wikapedia.

and heres my contribution

 

l85: Bolivia

Jamaica: Used since 1992

United Kingdom

 

m4:Users

A member of the Philippine Special Action Force holding a M4 Carbine while guarding the U.S. Embassy in Manila.

Indonesian police unit, Detachment 88

Members of the Serbian SAJ, the one in the center holding a Colt Model 933 while the one on the left holds a SIG SG 552.

Officers of the Police Special Operations Battalion of Rio de Janeiro (BOPE-RJ) Using the Colt 933 assault rifle while doing an operation in a favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Argentina: All the forces.[citation needed]

Afghanistan: Used only by Afghan Army commandos.[26][27] M4s sold as part of a 2006 Foreign Military Sales package.[28] Additional M4s sold as a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29]

Australia: Used by the Special Operations Command,[30] Clearance Divers.[31] and Police Tactical Groups[32]

Bangladesh: Used by Bangladesh Paracommandos, Dhaka Metropolitan Police SWAT teams and Special Warfare Diving And Salvage[33]

Bahrain: M4A1s sold as a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29]

Belize: M4s/M4A1s sold as part of a 2006 Foreign Military Sales package.[28]

Brazil: Used by Military Police of Rio de Janeiro State.[34]

Canada: C8 rifle.[35]

Czech Republic: The M4 Karabin A3 is used in small numbers by specialized units of the Czech Army.[36] Known to be in use by the 601st Special Forces Group in 2006 to replace the Sa vz.58.[37]

Colombia: M4A1s as part of a 2008 Foreign Military Sales.[29]

Ecuador: M4s sold as a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29]

El Salvador: M4s sold as part of a 2007 Foreign Military Sales package.[38] Additional M4s sold as a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29]

Georgia: Georgian Armed Forces.[39][40]

Greece: Used by EKAM.[41]

Hong Kong: M4A1 by Special Duties Unit of the Hong Kong Police Force[42]

Hungary: M4A1 SOPMOD by Hungarian Special Force [43]

India: M4A1s as part of a 2008 Foreign Military Sales.[29] M4A1 is also used by the Mizoram Armed Police, and Force One of the Mumbai Police.[44][45]

Indonesia: Used by Detachment 88 Counter-terrorism Police Squad operators.[46] Also used by Komando Pasukan Katak (Kopaska) tactical diver group and Komando Pasukan Khusus (Kopassus) special forces group.[47]

Iraq: Used by the Iraqi Army.[48] Main weapon of the Iraqi National Counter-Terrorism Force.[49]

Israel: Sold as part of a January 2001 Foreign Military Sales package to Israel.[50]

Italy: Only Special Forces[51]

Jamaica: M4s sold as part of a 2007 Foreign Military Sales package.[38]

Japan: M4A1s as part of a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29] M4A1 SOPMOD rifles are in use by the Japanese Special Forces Group.[52]

Jordan: M4s sold as part of a 2007 Foreign Military Sales package.[38] Additionals M4s sold as a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29]

Lebanon: M4 components being sold to Lebanese special forces.[53] M4/M4A1s sold as a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29]

Macedonia: M4s sold as a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29]

Malaysia: Made under license by SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd.[54] To be used by the Malaysian Armed Forces, special forces of Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency and Royal Malaysian Police.[55]

Nepal: Sold as part of a 2005 Foreign Military Sales package.[56]

New Zealand: Used by NZSAS operators and the police Armed Offenders Squad.[57][58]

Panama: M4A1s sold as a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29]

Philippines: M4/M4A1s sold as a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29] Two variants of the M4 carbine are made by Floro International Corporation, consisting of the M4A1 5.56MM RIFLE and the M4A1 Model-C 5.56MM RIFLE.[59][60]

Poland: Used by Polish special forces unit Grupa Reagowania Operacyjno-Manewrowego (GROM).[61]

Portugal: Used by Marines special forces DAE (Destacamento de Acções Especiais).[62]

Serbia: Used by various police units.[63]

Singapore: Used by the Singapore Armed Forces Commando Formation.[64]

Taiwan: Used by National Police Agency (Republic of China) [65]

Thailand: M4A1s sold as part of a 2006 Foreign Military Sales package.[28]

Tonga: M4/M4A1s sold as a 2008 Foreign Military Sales package.[29]

Turkey:Used by Special Forces[66]

United Arab Emirates: Purchased 2,500 M4 carbines in 1993.[67]

United States[35]

Yemen: M4s sold as part of a 2006 Foreign Military Sales package.[28]

 

aiaw (l96) Australia: Australian Defence Force with folding stock known as the SR-98,[21][22] Police Tactical Groups.[23]

Bangladesh[24]

Belgium[25]

Czech Republic: Purchased a number of AWF rifles.[26]

Greece : Special Anti-Terrorist Unit aka EKAM [27]

Ireland[28]

Italy: PM variant.[29] The AWS variant is used by the 9th Parachute Assault Regiment[30] and the AWP variant is used by the Carabinieri.[31]

Latvia[29]

Malaysia: PM and AW variants are used by the Malaysian Special Operations Force.[32]

Netherlands: Korps Commandotroepen (few AW and AWC 7.62×51mm NATO chambered arms available).[33][34]

New Zealand[29]

Portugal: Portuguese Army.[35]

Spain[29]

Sweden: Adopted the AW rifle in 1988, designated PSG 90.[36][37]

United Kingdom: L96A1 entered service with the British Armed Forces in 1985.[38]

 

sig 550(+ variants) Brazil: Uses the SG 550 and SG 551 variants.[8]

France: The SG 551 and SG 551 LB carbines are used by some specialized units of the French Army.[9]

Germany: The German Federal Police's counter-terrorism unit GSG 9 and the Spezialeinsatzkommando groups of some state police forces employ the SG 551 and SG 551 LB carbines in a variety of roles under the designation G37.[10]

India: Used by the National Security Guard (NSG).[11]

Indonesia: SG 550 and SG 552 variants are used by the Komando Pasukan Katak (Kopaska) tactical diver group and Komando Pasukan Khusus (Kopassus) special forces group.[12]

Malaysia: The Royal Malaysian Air Force's counter-terrorism unit PASKAU employ the SG 552 and SG 553 LB/SB carbines.[13][14]

Poland: Grupa Reagowania Operacyjno-Manewrowego (GROM) special forces group.[15][16]

Slovakia: The Slovak Police Útvar Osobitného Určenia ("special assignments unit") utilizes the SG 551 SWAT carbine.[17]

Spain: National police GEO special operations group uses both the SG 551 SWAT and SG 552.[18][19]

Switzerland: The SG 550 is the standard service rifle of the Swiss Armed Forces.[20]

United States: Used by some federal agencies such as the Drug Enforcement Administration (SG 551).[21]

 

just trying to add more to revive the forum.

 

m9:

US Navy sailors conduct small arms qualificationThe M9 is the standard pistol of the United States Navy, United States Army and the United States Air Force. The M9A1 is also seeing limited issue to the United States Marine Corps.[12] A large number of M9s and M9A1s were ordered in 2006. During the 2009 SHOT Show, Beretta announced it had received a US$220 million contract for the delivery of 450,000 M9s and M9A1s to the U.S. military, within a five-year span.[13]

 

The Marine Corps Times reported plans in July 2007 for all officers below the rank of Colonel and all SNCOs to be issued the M4 carbine instead of the M9.[14] The new assignment policy will still assign M9s to Marine Colonels and above and Navy Petty Officer First Class and above.[15]

 

The United States Coast Guard has replaced most of its M9s with the SIG P229 DAK, though some M9s remain in service with certain units.

 

The M9 is issued to crew members on Military Sealift Command vessels.[16]

 

BerettaUSA announced on September 30, 2011 that the U.S. Army's Foreign Military Sales program has purchased an additional 15,778 Model 92FS pistols for the Afghan military and other U.S. allies.[17] The Model 92FS is the non-U.S. military designation for the M9 pistol.

 

sorry its laid out weirdly.

 

m14

Argentina: Used by Argentine soldiers of C Company, Regimento (Especial) de Infanteria 25 in the Falklands War at the Battle of Goose Green and San Carlos.[10]

Australia: M14 SAGE EBR used in limited number by the Special Air Service Regiment/Special Operations Task Group in Afghanistan.[25][26][27]

Colombia[28]

Costa Rica[28]

Dominican Republic[28]

Ecuador[28]

El Salvador[28]

Eritrea[28]

Estonia: Adopted by Estonian military as marksman's rifle, modified by E-Arsenal called the Täpsuspüss M14-TP (Precision Rifle M14-PR), with heavy barrel, bipod, synthetic stock, and optical 4X sight.[29][30]

Ethiopia[28]

Greece: Hellenic Navy

Haiti: Used by Haiti security forces in the 2004 Haitian rebellion.[10]

Honduras[28]

Israel: Used as sniper rifle with eventual conversion and production as M89SR.[10][31]

Lithuania: Lithuanian Armed Forces.[32]

Niger[28]

Philippines[28]

South Korea: Unknown number provided by the United States under military assistance programme.[33] In limited use with reserve forces and for ceremonial duties.[34]

Taiwan: Made under license as the Type 57.[10]

Tunisia[28]

United States: Uses the M14SE, manufactured by Smith Enterprises, in SDM roles[35] and has purchased M14s from other manufacturers. Also uses M14s custom built or modified in military armories, such as the M14 DMR. The M14 is issued to crew members on Military Sealift Command vessels.[36]

Venezuela[37]

 

m1911

Argentina[7]

Bangladesh: Rapid Action Battalion.[36]

Brazil: The Brazilian Army uses a version of the M1911 developed by IMBEL chambered in 9x19mm Parabellum and designated M973.[37][38]

Bolivia[39][40]

People's Republic of China[39][40] Norinco exports a clone of the M1911A1 for civilian purchase。The Chinese arms company also manufactured conversion kits to chamber the 7.62x25mm Tokarev round after the Korean War.[citation needed]

Republic of China[39] Use the T51K1 (second version of Taiwanese M1911) chambered in the .45 ACP round before using both Colt and the T-51 (first verson of Taiwanese M1911).[citation needed]

Colombia[39][40]

Costa Rica[39][40]

Dominican Republic[39][40]

Ecuador[40]

Fiji[39]

Greece[25]

Guatemala[40][41]

Hong Kong[39][40] Was a sidearm for Surveillance Support Unit of Hong Kong Police Force and now being replaced by SIG Sauer P250 and the Glock 17 pistols.[citation needed]

Haiti[39][40]

Indonesia[41]

Iran[39][41]

Liberia[39]

Lithuania: Lithuanian Armed Forces.[42]

Luxembourg: In service with 1st Artillery Battalion 1963-1967.[43]

Mexico[39][40][41]

Nazi Germany[7] Used captured pistols during WWII.

Nicaragua[39][40]

Norway[7]

Philippines[39]

Spain[44]

South Korea:[7] Made under license by S&T Daewoo and used by Republic of Korea Air Force as officers' sidearms.[citation needed]

South Vietnam[7]

Soviet Union: Thousands of pistols were received as military assistance during World War II.[44]

United Kingdom[7]

United States: Former standard-issue service pistol of the United States Armed forces. The pistol remains in service with various law enforcement agencies across the country, as well as some US Special Forces soldiers. A quantity of 5,000 was purchased by the FBI Hostage Rescue Team.[44]

Zimbabwe[39]

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